What have you been watching? Including The Bridge, Arrow, The Flash, Legends and You’re The Worst

It’s “What have you been watching?”, my chance to tell you what movies and TV I’ve been watching recently that I haven’t already reviewed and your chance to recommend things to everyone else (and me) in case I’ve missed them.

The usual “TMINE recommends” page features links to reviews of all the shows I’ve ever recommended, and there’s also the Reviews A-Z, for when you want to check more or less anything I’ve reviewed ever. And if you want to know when any of these shows are on in your area, there’s Locate TV – they’ll even email you a weekly schedule.

December’s here, Christmas is nearly upon us and a lot of series are coming to the end of their current seasons or have had their mid-season finales. The only new shows hitting our screens now are either trying to get in under the wire by box-setting us or are mere previews for shows that will get their full runs next year. Cases in point are South of Hell (US: WE tv) and Superstore (US: NBC), which I reviewed earlier this week

That means that after the jump, given I’ve already passed a third-episode verdict on Into The Badlands (US: AMC; UK: Amazon Instant Video), I’ll only be looking at Arrow, Bron/Broen (The Bridge), Doctor Who, The Flash, Grandfathered, Legends, Supergirl and You’re The Worst. I’ve made a start on The Man In The High Castle but I’ve only got a couple of episodes in, so I’ll save them up for a full review next week or the week after. Some time before Christmas anyway.

Shows I’m watching but not recommending

Grandfathered (US: Fox)
1×9 – Jimmy & Son
You can tell this is for old people: it has advice like “Don’t follow your dreams. Your dreams are stupid. You need to get a proper job, a really crappy one at first, but over time, you’ll get better and better ones. You’ll need to do this because of rent.” I like this show. Not sure about Paget Brewster’s new boyfriend. She also needs to get more to do. 
Where can I watch it?
Reviews: First episodethird episode

Legends (US: TNT; UK: Sky1)
2×4 – The Legend of Ilyana Zakayeva
And Legends thankfully returns to spy show mode, rather than ‘homeless dosser ambling around Paris’ mode, with Sean Bean getting to be all shady and sneaky, without becoming too much like Jason Bourne. It does feel like this is a turning point episode, with the writing off of the fall out from the season 1 format nearly done and the show properly embracing its new scenario. Fingers crossed, hey?
Where can I watch it?
Reviews: 2×1-2×2

Supergirl (US: CBS; UK: Sky1)
1×6 – Red Faced
Again, as with last week, the show is improving, both in terms of effects and general writing, with Kara’s final fight scene actually a bit spine-tingling in place. After The Devil Wears Prada-ing Callista Flockhart at the beginning, the writers are now transforming her into a sort of mentor, and the Jimmy-Lucy-Kara love triangle at least has some legs and is better than anything in Smallville with Lucy, despite some odd messages (“Give up your career to be with your boyfriend!”). It’s still as daft as a brush, though. Guest DC villain of the week was Red Tornado, played by Iddo Goldberg, who really hasn’t got any better since Bye Bye Harry.
Interesting note of the week: I could be wrong, but it looks like the writers have decided to bring in some nu52 concepts from the comics, although one from Superman rather than Supergirl, with (spoiler alert) Kara losing her powers at the end, shortly after going super-psycho with her heat vision. Used up all her solar energy in one go, perhaps?
Game of the week: Take a drink every time someone say Superman. You’ll be hammered by the end of every episode, I promise.
Where can I watch it?
Reviews: First episodethird episode

The recommended list

Arrow (US: The CW; UK: Sky1)
4×8 – Legends of Yesterday
You should probably read The Flash entry first as this was the second-part of the crossover. Done that now? Good. Okay, so in a week that a movie studio issued a formal apology for ‘whitewashing’ ancient Egypt in the forthcoming Gods of Luxor, this was a badly timed episode to say the least, with not only the reincarnated Egyptian prince Hawkman played by white East German actor Falk Hentschel and the immortal Egyptian priest Vandal Savage played by white Danish actor Casper Crump, but pretty much everyone in ancient Egypt bar the slaves played by white actors, too. Oh dear. It doesn’t help that Arrow has form on this with Ra’s al Ghul, either. That minor problem – and some Greek that’s clearly come from the miracles of Google Translate, rather than anyone who speaks it – aside, a good conclusion to the story that takes some of the best bits of The Flash and adds them to an Arrow episode to give us a Run, Barry, Run do-over piece. Daft coda to it all, but necessary for Legends of Tomorrow, of course.
When’s it airing near me?
Reviews: First episodethird episode 

The Bridge (Bron/Broen) (Sweden: SVT1; Denmark: DK1; UK: BBC4)
3×3-3×4
Lovely stuff, and shaping up almost to be my favourite season so far, with the show avoiding having any devious masterminds, so far, just whack jobs, and some decent detective work going on, too. New Danish guy feels at times like he’s simply inherited Martin’s old storyline, but there are obviously extremely interesting points of divergence. Meanwhile, Sofia Helin and the writers have clearly been reading up on Asperger’s, judging by how much more they’re playing on it. Great stuff.
Interesting note of the week: Whatever you do kiddies, never play Russian Roulette with a blank, because it’s still going to kill you.
Where can I watch it?
Reviews: First episode

Doctor Who (UK: BBC; US: BBC America)
9×11 – Heaven Sent
We’ve already discussed this quite a bit in the comments section of last week’s entry, but just for the record, I loved this one. Easily my favourite Capaldi story (not that I can remember almost any other Capaldi stories, which tells you something), it’s basically a modern day version of The Avengers‘ The House That Jack Built and almost as good, with a great payoff when the mystery is solved. There are obvious holes (does chaos theory mean nothing to these people?), but you can plaster over them if that’s what you need, since it’s clearly a modern classic.
Where can I watch it?


 

The Flash (US: The CW; UK: Sky 1)
2×8 – Legends of Today
Just come here from Arrow? Good choice. So this was the much-heralded two-parter, in which everyone from Arrow comes over to The Flash and vice versa. A more robust crossover than previous episodes, with everything integral rather than bolted on, sadly it still had to revolve around building up excitement for the forthcoming Legends of Tomorrow, by introducing Vandal Savage, Hawkman, Hawkgirl et al, and then having the whole story revolve around that. Still, it did enable the Arrow crew to crack even more funnies than usual and for The Flash posse to make cracks about Arrow‘s more arch qualities (On Malcolm Merlin: “Does he always enter the room like that. Can’t he just use a door?”). Also on the plus side, the show did remember to carry on with its usual storylines, with Harrison Wells, Patty, Jay and co all getting a look-in, too. Now you can go back to the Arrow entry.
When’s it airing near me?
Reviews: First episodethird episode  

You’re The Worst (US: FXX)
2×12 – Other Things You Could Be Doing
I really wasn’t looking forward to this after the events of the previous episode. I even put it off for a couple of days. But it turned out to be delightful. The interesting thing about You’re The Worst is that even though the people in are pretty awful, you still end up loving them, because there is an element of decency in them, at least with each other. So while Jimmy is pretty awful to everyone else in the episode, ultimately he’s almost tear-jerkingly lovely to Gretchen at the end. And actually, everyone else was great, too, and it wasn’t the miserable episode I was expecting at all.
Interesting note of the week: the ending’s almost exactly this comic, which I assume was the point.
When’s it airing near me?
Review: First episode

  • benjitek

    'New Danish guy' will surprise you [evil grin]. Finale was great, resolves the story and sets up the next season well.

  • Mark Carroll

    With crossovers among current shows and between current and new, the superhero franchises certainly include cunning salespeople.

    We finished “The Man in the High Castle”. It stayed pretty good. Perhaps it left us with more questions than answers, but that's okay, I'll certainly watch the next season, there'd better be one. It stayed pretty consistent and had some engaging characters. It was interesting culturally, too, I actually learned a little more about real history than I'd known from looking things up to compare with what I'd seen in the story. My one, small criticism was that the plot/drama did hinge rather on a couple of rather lucky coincidences.

    “Jessica Jones” is staying good. She remains an appealing character and they haven't spent too much time on silly explanations. It's one of the best shows we have right now. Still an episode or two to go though.

    We tried the first episode of Josh Widdicombe's new sitcom. It was reasonable, and I could see where it was coming from, but none of us felt sufficiently inclined to watch another.

    “The Walking Dead” is staying much as ever. Not on the recommended list. Nor is “Grimm”, though that's perhaps been better than it has.

    I'm still enjoying “Terminator: TSCC”, the second season's better than I recalled.

  • The history's quite good in TMITH and there are scenes that are good at making drier facts come alive. Some of it's debatable, mind. Some historians think Hitler wanted to ban Christianity after the War, for sure, but pre-War, he tried to unify all the Protestant churches into a single Reich church. So would he ban the Bible in the US? Possibly, but it seems a stretch, more there to make the Nazis seem Very Bad to the average US viewer, and avoid the waters of Good v Evil being muddied by having a Christian Nazi Party running the US, than because that was the most likely outcome. Certainly, that short a time after the War, it seems unlikely that the Nazis would have been able to get rid of the most popular book in a country as staunchly Christian as the US

  • Ooh. Exciting! Not sure about a season four – the producers have been talking about how three seasons seems to be the optimum for Danish crime shows and the head of DR1 was talking over the weekend about how crime has been an over-used genre in Denmark and is thinking of scaling back, which makes it sound like The Bridge is on its way out. But cash.

    Now you mention it, yes, Arrow managed to avoid a flashback. I don't know if that's a first, but it's rare, certainly. I don't think they're gone, though.

  • Andy Butcher

    Pretty sure they're not gone, if only because the current 'back on the island' thread hasn't been resolved.

    Plus I've always kinda expected the flashbacks to run to at least the point when they reach the start of the first season, which should (in theory) happen in season five…

  • JustStark

    When was the last one of these? Tap tap tap. Oh, right.

    Well. Doctor Who, I suppose. Last in the series and, wonder of wonders, they actually put in some story! I mean, it was over an hour long, and there was only about twenty minutes of story in the middle, bookended by long undramatic talky expositional scenes about Rassilon, and then even longer boring undramatic talky scenes about Clara. I never thought I'd be saying Russell Davies did a better job of constructing a plot to get to a particular point, but when he did this exact plotline, he did!

    Also it really annoys me how much Doctor Who these days is constructed just to make certain section so the internet go, 'Yay!' Especially when it totally undermines itself by so doing… for example, sending Clara off to be the Doctor when the whole point of three episodes ago was that when she tries to be the Doctor, she doesn't have the knowledge, so she gets it wrong and gets herself killed!

    (It almost spoiled for me the old console room, which I loved to see but the idea that it had been put in just in order to make people who live in the internet squeal with joy left a bad taste in the mouth… until a friend pointed out that actually it was there because they'd spent the money building it for An Adventure in Time and Space, so really they were just being cheap and recycling, and that is a reason for putting stuff in the Doctor Who that I can get behind).

    In short: worst year for Doctor Who since Catherine Tate.

    So what else? Hm. I watched the second episode of Blindspot. No dialogue that plumbed the depth of the first one… perhaps it was just inept pilotage. Though I do wish I could have seen the thought process that went from, 'We have to show that maybe she was a bad person,' to, 'Let's have her shoot a nun!'

    The Returned. If they explained anything I didn't follow it. I now hate them.

    Homeland was a filler episode, where the consequences of Carrie's realisation at the end of the last episode spawned a pointless runaround that took the entire time to get to where they should have been ten minutes in. Disappointing and time-wasting.

    Peep Show, not a classic like the last one, but solid.

  • Mark Carroll

    I realized I couldn't remember any resolution at all to the latest Doctor Who until my daughter reminded me of the reversed polarity part. I'm looking forward to a time when maybe companions aren't quite as amazingly special as all that. Perhaps next he could pick up someone he mildly dislikes.

  • JustStark

    I realized I couldn't remember any resolution at all to the latest
    Doctor Who until my daughter reminded me of the reversed polarity part

    Well, that was very unclear too: as I understood it, the problem was that Clara not dying would cause ructions in the space-time continuum, so the Time Lords wanted to put her back. And the Doctor's solution to this was to wipe her memory so that the Time Lords couldn't use her memories to find her… but if there was a way in which this was supposed to fix the 'all of time collapsing because she didn't die when she was supposed to' problem then I missed it.

  • IIRC there was no fix. The Doctor just gambled that it wouldn't blow up the universe if he hid Clara somewhere. I can't remember why the brain wiping was in there, particularly the bit about wiping the Doctor's memory – not sure how that would have solved anything.

    But Stevie says 'because' basically. So it is

  • Tried that with Peri

  • Stevie's basically doing Russell T Davies TV, but instead of doing it as joyfully Welsh working class TV, he's doing dour middle class Scottish TV. Otherwise, it's basically the same.

    Like a whole crop of the new US TV shows, Blindspot gets better from the second episode. However, it never gets that much better.

  • Until the Flash changes the time streams

  • Robin Parker

    something to do with stopping the dangerous Doc/Clara combo (one of the mooted answers to the hybrid) from doing more damage – undo one of their memories to split them apart (I think)

  • JustStark

    something to do with stopping the dangerous Doc/Clara combo (one of the mooted answers to the hybrid) from doing more damage

    But wasn't the damage that Clara didn't die? Isn't that what was going to tear the universe apart, or something?

    (And the eventual solution was to basically freeze Clara in time so she doesn't age and promise to put her back eventually, thus both giving her many extra years of life and fooling the universe into thinking everything was the same… which is exactly the kind of solution you'd think the Doctor should be coming up with, especially as it's pretty much just a slight variation on what he did to avoid his own death just a couple of years ago).

  • JustStark

    Stevie's basically doing Russell T Davies TV, but instead of doing it as
    joyfully Welsh working class TV, he's doing dour middle class Scottish
    TV

    I would have said that instead of doing, 'It doesn't matter if it makes sense, just put the emotions in there' he's doing, 'It doesn't matter if it makes sense, just put the clever bits in there', but that may just be what you wrote. Duns Scotus rather than Tom Jones.

    And both love to jam in the awful crowd-pleasing bits, don't they?

    Blindspot gets better from the second episode. However, it never gets that much better.

    Well, I'll see if it starts to exhibit what usually makes me stop watching most US dramas (that aren't explicitly either serials or one-full-serial-per-year a la Homeland): when every episode becomes structurally identical so watching them is incredibly boring.

  • “but that may just be what you wrote”

    That, fewer speeches about how brilliant people are (“people are rubbish”) and fewer celebrity guest stars (“why pay money for that Timothy Dalton to play Rassilon when you can get that bloke off Game of Thrones for not even half the price? And people are rubbish anyway. I wish I could do stories without people. You reckon I could do a story with the minimum number of people possible ie one? I think I could…”)

  • JustStark

    fewer celebrity guest stars

    Oh, I thought one thing that had definitely carried over was the tradition of blatant stunt casting. What else would you call Nick Frost, Michelle Gomez,
    Reece Shearsmith, Richard E. Grant etc etc…

  • Stevie tends to cast people who are proper actors, rather than celeb celebs, if you see what I mean. Michelle Gomez, Richard E Grant et al are proper actors. Gomez isn't that famous, of course (would anybody have been able to have remembered her name/picked her from a line-up before she was Missy?). Reece Shearsmith ain't famous, except to fanboys and he only gets cast because he's mates with Mark Gatiss.

    But what I mean by celebrity casting is the likes of McFly (or was it Busted?), Anne Widdicombe, soap stars, BBC3 stars, John Simm (“he's so hot right now”), Catherine Tate and basically anyone who's a name but not an actor and/or who's down with the kids. (Tate's a Shakespearean actor of note, of course, but that's not why she was hired for The Runaway Bride. It's because she was the star of The Catherine Tate Show).

    The exception is Christmas specials. All bets are off then. The Rusty template holds for them.

  • JustStark

    Gomez isn't that famous, of course (would anybody have been able to have
    remembered her name/picked her from a line-up before she was Missy?).

    Sue White? Of bloody course!

    But what I mean by celebrity casting is the likes of McFly (or was it
    Busted?), Anne Widdicombe, soap stars, BBC3 stars, John Simm (“he's so
    hot right now”), Catherine Tate

    I think John Simm counts as a proper actor! And Catherine Tate, much as I hate her, was well-known as a comedy actress (sketch acting is still acting) when she was cast. Likewise Bernard Cribbens, Maureen Lipman, Roger Lloyd-Pack etc.

    As for the others, though (eg McFly and Widdicombe), they were just doing cameos rather than actually playing parts, and Moffatt is perfectly willing to get non-actors in to do cameos: Richard Dawkins, for example, or Foxes.

    Basically I don't see much difference in the level of stunt casting between the two, or at least that can't be explained by the fact that the budget was slashed after the banking crisis thus meaning that the likes of Timothy Dalton and Kylie Minogue are simply out of financial reach. But given Moffat's willingness to stunt-cast whenever he can, eg with Michael Sheen, I don't see any reason to think that he wouldn't do exactly what Davies did, if he could afford it.

  • “Sue White?”

    Who? (Looks her up). Oh, Green Wing. Didn't watch more than an episode. Only 2 million people did and that was about a decade ago now, when 'the kidz' would have been 'the infantz'. So she's famous in the same way that Reece Sheersmith is famous, I'm afraid.

    “John Simm counts as a proper actor”

    He did – until Doctor Who. I think DW sucked him dry, judging by Intruders.

    “well-known as a comedy actress (sketch acting is still acting) when she was cast”

    That was my point. She was famous. She was down with the kids. She wasn't picked because of her appearances in Big Train and Attention Scum, good though they were.

    Ditto Billie Piper (better known as a singer than an actress) at the time and Freema Agyeman (aka 'her off Crossroads'). Ditto David Tennant (“BBC3's Casanova”) and even Christopher Eccleston (not your obvious first-choice casting for a kids show).

    I'm not saying that they can't act, only that their fame/popularity/potential popularity with 'the kidz' was more of a motivator for casting for Rusty than for Stevie.

    “As for the others, though (eg McFly and Widdicombe), they were just doing cameos rather than actually playing parts, and Moffatt is perfectly willing to get non-actors in to do cameos: Richard Dawkins, for example, or Foxes”

    Doesn't matter. Cameos or not, they were cast and they were cast because they were famous.

    You and I may differ on how 'down with the kidz' Richard Dawkins is. Middle class kidz who watch the Royal Christmas Institution Lectures, maybe; the kidz who watch The X-Factor and BBC3? Less so, I suspect.

    But I'm not saying Stevie never does it, only that he's far less inclined to and his choices differ markedly. Except at Christmas.

    “I don't see any reason to think that he wouldn't do exactly what Davies did, if he could afford it.”

    Maybe. But he doesn't do it. And I'm not talking about looking into his soul – I'm talking about what's up there on screen and how it's different from what went before it. Maybe in some parallel universe where Stevie walks around in diamond shoes and has gold cufflinks, his version of Who is identical to Rusty's. I'm just saying the version we've got is different in those regards.

  • JustStark

    So she's famous in the same way that Reece Sheersmith is famous, I'm afraid.

    In UK-TV terms, she's famous. Like, for instance, the League of Gentlemen and the cast of Goodness Gracious Me (have they all been on Doctor Who yet?).

    Ditto Billie Piper (better known as a singer than an actress) at the time

    It's true she was better known as a singer,but that's not why she was cast: she was cast because the year before she had done Bella and the Boys, which I saw, and which proved she could carry a TV programme. She definitely wasn't stunt casting in the same way that, say,

    Ditto David Tennant (“BBC3's Casanova”) and even Christopher Eccleston (not your obvious first-choice casting for a kids show).

    But you're undermining your own argument here! You claim that Davies cast people specifically to appeal to 'kids' but then as examples you offer up two actors who 'kids' would never have heard of!

    Eccleston certainly wasn't cast to appeal to 'the kids' ('Wow, man, it's that guy off Our Friends in the North! Gotta watch that innit!') and Tennant had only been on a couple of obscure TV things (Casanova and Blackpool — he was much better known in the theatre world, a world which does not have much overlap with 'the kids').

    (In fact, I'm fairly sure that the reason both of them were cast is that they had worked with Davies before and Davies likes working with people he has worked with before).

    You and I may differ on how 'down with the kidz' Richard Dawkins is.
    Middle class kidz who watch the Royal Christmas Institution Lectures,
    maybe; the kidz who watch The X-Factor and BBC3? Less so, I suspect

    Whereas Anne Widdicombe (your example, remember) is just so Radio 1 Xtra?

    You're cherry-picking: you're pointing at all the Davies ones who support your argument, when there are loads that don't, some you've even mentioned (like Widdicombe) and ignoring the instances when Moffat does exactly the same thing (Brian Cox; Alan Sugar; Foxes, who is so painfully hip she only turns up on the channel they play in my gym).

    But I'm not saying Stevie never does it, only that he's far less inclined to and his choices differ markedly

    Only if you ignore half the evidence. Could you really not see Davies, for example, casting Alan Sugar? He so would have, if he could. That's not a choice that 'differs markedly'. Brian Cox too.

    Davies casts Peter Kay as a baddy; Moffat casts Ben Miller. Those aren't casting choices from different universes.

    Davies casts soap stars at cat-burglars; Moffatt sticks the TARDIS into Suranne Jones.

    Davies casts Felicity Kendall; Moffatt, Diana Rigg.

    I'm talking about what's up there on screen and how it's different from what went before it

    And I'm talking about what's up on screen and really, if you consider all the evidence, it's just not that different. Apart from a couple of big-ticket celebs that Davies could afford (but only for Christmas specials, note) and Moffatt can't, they both are about equally likely to cast ex-soap stars, comedians, and to get cameos from reality TV stars as each other.

  • “In UK-TV terms, she's famous. “

    Nope. Not with the demographic aka 'the kidz' we're talking about – ITV1, ITV2 and BBC3 viewers, from the ages of about 8 through to 21ish, say, probably not ABC1 – 'children and young people' as the term goes. Absolutely unknown outside of Who with that demo, I would guess, unless she's been in something else that I missed on her CV.

    The League of Gentlemen aired between 1995 and 2002, so about half the demographic in question weren't even alive when it aired. Famous with a cult audience, maybe; not outside that, except perhaps for other work.

    Goodness Gracious Me has at least had the good grace to have aired a new episode in the past two years, but still probably not 'down with the kidz'.

    “she was cast because the year before she had done Bella and the Boys, which I saw, and which proved she could carry a TV programme.”

    Which no one else watched. It doesn't even merit more than a mention in her filmography on her Wiki page, which is mostly about her fame as a singer, followed by her fame as a Doctor Who companion.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/

    But even if it proved she could carry a TV programme (she had been to drama school and she could act – that's not in dispute), that's not why she was cast. No one said “People will watch this because now we have that woman from Bella and the Boys in it.” It's because it got headlines in the Sun and because she was known to 'the kidz'.

    “two actors who 'kids' would never have heard of!”

    As I said, 'BBC3's Casanova'. As I also said, the kidz are the ones who watch BBC3. No one else does. That's not its aim. So not knowing him from Casanova is extremely likely for anyone who's not one of the kidz. But that doesn't mean the kidz don't know him. I can't name anyone from One Direction – doesn't mean the kidz can't.

    I grant you, Eccelston (who was asked after Hugh Grant and Rowan Atkinson both said no) wasn't cast to appeal to the kids – he was cast largely because he was famous with a completely different demographic: adults, particularly critics, so that they'd take Doctor Who seriously (Jane Trantor bragged about that very point). However, Piper was there for the kidz – if it had been Eccleston and Lesley Sharp, I doubt the show would have lasted more than a season.

    Yes, Rusty does like working with people he's worked with before. But he was just as focused on getting headlines and the youth viewer with casting as JNT was. Whereas Stevie isn't. This season, we've basically had Arya Stark from Game of Thrones for the celeb/”for the kidz' casting and that's about it (see later). Even then, Game of Thrones isn't exactly a show that every 12 year old gets to watch, so ironically, she's more for the 16+ crowd. Would Rusty have ever let that happen? I doubt it

    “Whereas Anne Widdicombe (your example, remember) is just so Radio 1 Xtra?”
    I think you're overlooking just how popular she was at the time from Strictly Come Dancing. It was brief, but it boosted her fame considerably among the kids. That was when the kidz were watching Strictly still, of course.

    “If you consider all the evidence, it's just not that different”
    It's a bit different. I don't think Stevie, for instance, has done an episode based around Big Brother, The Weakest Link and Trinny and Susannah, for example.

    I think Rusty might have avoided Alan Sugar because he's not exactly big with 16-year-olds (I think Junior Apprentice proved that), but he might have gone for it. Yes, he'd probably have picked up on Brian Cox, even though he is more popular with the average middle class, bright kid than the average young viewer of EastEnders.

    I mean if it comes to it, let's go through the famous guest casts, season by season, using the Wiki 'notable guest cast' lists and my slightly imperfect knowledge of famous people. It's not perfect but it's illustrative, I think.

    1 – Mark Benton, Zoë Wanamaker, Simon Callow, Eve Myles, Penelope Wilton, Annette Badland, Matt Baker, Andrew Marr, Corey Johnson, Simon Pegg, Anna Maxwell-Martin, Tamsin Greig, Florence Hoath, Richard Wilson, Jo Joyner, Davina McCall, Paterson Joseph, Anne Robinson, Trinny Woodall, Susannah Constantine and Shaun Dingwall.
    “For the kids”: Davina McCall, Anne Robinson, Trinny Woodall, Susannah Constantine. Arguably, Simon Pegg and Richard Wilson, too, given it's 2005. Maybe Paterson Joseph from Peep Show for older kids, but maybe not.

    2- Adam Garcia, Daniel Evans, Zoë Wanamaker, Anna Hope, Pauline Collins, Anthony Head, Sophia Myles, Roger Lloyd-Pack, Andrew Hayden-Smith, Don Warrington, Maureen Lipman, Danny Webb, Shaun Parkes, Claire Rushbrook, Will Thorp, Marc Warren, Peter Kay, Shirley Henderson, Simon Greenall, Moya Brady, Kathryn Drysdale, Nina Sosanya, Tracy-Ann Oberman, Raji James, Barbara Windsor, Derek Acorah, Alistair Appleton, Trisha Goddard
    “For the kids”: Adam Garcia, Marc Warren, Shirley Henderson, Tracy-Ann Oberman, Barbara Windsor, Derek Acorah, Trisha Goddard

    3 – Reggie Yates, Thelma Barlow, Ryan Carnes, Christina Cole, Michelle Collins, Lenora Crichlow, Anthony Flanagan, Andrew Garfield, Lucy Gaskell, Mark Gatiss, Don Gilet, Jennifer Hennessy, Jessica Hynes, Derek Jacobi, Dean Lennox Kelly, Matt King, Chris Larkin, Harry Lloyd, Stephen Marcus, Roy Marsden, McFly, Carey Mulligan, Michael Obiora, Ardal O'Hanlon, Travis Oliver, Sharon Osbourne, Sarah Parish, Angela Pleasence, Hugh Quarshie, Miranda Raison, Anne Reid, Thomas Sangster, John Simm and Ann Widdecombe.
    “For the kids”: Reggie Yates, Michelle Collins, Lenora Crichlow, McFly, Ardal O'Hanlon (ish), Sharon Osbourne, John Simm, Ann Widdecombe

    4 – Kylie Minogue (Astrid Peth in “Voyage of the Damned”), Alex Kingston (River Song in “Silence in the Library”/”Forest of the Dead”), Sarah Lancashire (Miss Foster in “Partners in Crime”), and Phil Davis and Peter Capaldi (Lucius and Caecillus respectively in “The Fires of Pompeii”).[7] Other guest stars included Sasha Behar, Tim McInnerny, Colin Morgan, Christopher Ryan, Georgia Moffett (daughter of Fifth Doctor actor Peter Davison and current wife of David Tennant), Nigel Terry, Felicity Kendal, Fenella Woolgar, Colin Salmon, Lesley Sharp, Lindsey Coulson, David Troughton (son of Second Doctor actor Patrick Troughton), and Chipo Chung (who had previously portrayed Chantho in “Utopia”).[8][9] Evolutionary biologist Richard Dawkins and Paul O'Grady made cameo appearances as themselves in “The Stolen Earth”
    “For the kids”: Kylie Minogue, Paul O'Grady, Colin Morgan.

    Hmm, I see Richard Dawkins actually appeared in season 4, not a Stevie season. Oh well.

    Now Stevie takes over

    5 – James Corden, Annette Crosbie, Tony Curran, Iain Glen, Daisy Haggard, Terrence Hardiman, Toby Jones, Helen McCrory, Neve McIntosh, Ian McNeice, Stephen Moore, Bill Nighy, Sophie Okonedo, Bill Paterson, Meera Syal, and Nina Wadia.[23][24]
    “For the kids”: James Corden, Bill Nighy (maybe), Meera Syal (at a push)

    6 – James Corden also reprised his role as Craig Owens from “The Lodger” in “Closing Time”,[8] and Simon Callow briefly reprised his role as Charles Dickens from the first series episode “The Unquiet Dead”.[9] “A Christmas Carol” guest-starred Michael Gambon and Katherine Jenkins.[10] Guest stars of the main series included Michael Sheen (voice),[11] Imelda Staunton (voice), Suranne Jones,[12] David Walliams,[13] Hugh Bonneville,[14] Lily Cole,[15] Mark Sheppard,[16] and Daniel Mays,[17]
    “For the kids”: Jason Corden (again), David Walliams, Lily Cole, Imelda Staunton (if we're counting voiceovers)

    7 – David Gyasi, Rupert Graves, David Bradley, Riann Steele as Queen Nefertiti in episode 2, Ben Browder, Adrian Scarborough, Garrick Hagon, Steven Berko
    ff, Ruthie Henshall, Jemma Redgrave, Michael McShane. Dougray Scott, Jessica Raine, David Warner and Liam Cunningham in episode 8,[18] Rachael Stirling and her mother Dame Diana Rigg in episode 11,[19] and Warwick Davis in episode 12.[20] Mark Williams appears in the second and fourth episodes as Rory's father.[19][21] Alex Kingston returned to the series as her character River Song for Amy and Rory's final episode[22] and the series finale.[23] Richard E. Grant and Tom Ward were cast in the 2012 Christmas special,[24] together with young actor Cameron Strefford playing a younger version of Grant's character. Ian McKellen also appears in the Christmas special, providing the original voice of the Great Intelligence.[25] Grant later returned in the mid-series premiere and the series finale, portraying the Great Intelligence
    “For the kids”: Rupert Graves (maybe), Warwick Davis (maybe), Ian McKellen (if we're counting voiceovers), Mark Williams

    8 – Keeley Hawes had been cast in episode five as a character named Ms. Delphox.[10] Subsequently, Tom Riley, Ben Miller, Hermione Norris, Frank Skinner, Foxes, Christopher Fairbank, Sanjeev Bhaskar, and Chris Addison were cast in guest roles.[11][12][13][14][15][16][17][18]
    “For the kids”: Keeley Hawes (ish), Ben Miller (maybe), Foxes

    9 – Arsher Ali, Morven Christie, Neil Fingleton, Colin McFarlane, and Steven Robertson.[8] Reece Shearsmith, Elaine Tan, Neet Mohan, Bethany Black and Paul Courtenay Hyu, Maisie Williams, Rufus Hound, Tom Stourton, Ariyon Bakare, Simon Lipkin, Ian Conningham, Murray McArthur, Barnaby Kay, John Voce, and Struan Rodger, David Schofield was announced to be playing Viking god Odin.[14] On 4 June 2015, it was announced that Rebecca Front, who starred alongside Capaldi in The Thick of It, would appear in “The Zygon Invasion”.[15] On 10 June 2015, it was announced that Joivan Wade would return as Rigsy, who previously appeared in “Flatline”. Robin Soans played Chronolock Guy in “Face the Raven”;[16] Soans previously appeared in Doctor Who as Luvic in The Keeper of Traken. Julian Bleach reprised his role as Davros, having last appeared in the role in 2008's “The Stolen Earth” / “Journey's End”, while Joey Price debuted as a younger version of the character. On September 28, 2015 it was announced that Corey Taylor, frontman for the heavy metal band Slipknot, would feature in the fourth episode “Before the Flood”, as the scream of the alien warlord Fisher King.[17]
    “For the kids”: Rufus Hound (kind of. Older ones if it is), Corey Taylor (if voiceovers count), Maisie Williams (ish).

    I mean I think you can probably argue about a name here and there (and Wiki leaves out Brian Cox and Alan Sugar, for example, so isn't 100% reliable), but if you're talking about 'the kidz' (ie children and young people who watch ITV1, ITV2, BBC3, etc) then I think it's relatively clear that Stevie's gone for fewer kidz-friendly choices.

    Maybe because of cash, maybe not. I think Stevie's more likely to cast someone who's a cult favourite or famous with older audiences, than Rusty was, though.