Mini-review: The Michael J Fox Show 1×1-1×2 (NBC)

It's a show about Michael J Fox


In the US: Thursdays, 9.30/8.30c, NBC

It’s surprisingly hard to say what The Michael J Fox Show is about. Is it about Michael J Fox, you might wonder? No, it’s about a former TV news anchor called Mike Henry who’s played by Michael J Fox. But at the same time, it’s also about Michael J Fox, since Henry quit his job after being diagnosed with Parkinson’s, just like the actor. Then NBC (in the form of The Wire‘s Wendell Pierce) goes to Fox – sorry, Henry – and asks if he’d like to come back. So he does. Just like the actor.

So it’s a show about TV journalism then? Well, no, because the first episode is largely a public information film about Parkinson’s, its effects, what it’s like to have it, the side-effects of its medicines and so on. While at the same time reassuring everyone that even if someone has Parkinson’s, they can still do their job.

So it’s a show about Parkinson’s then? Well, no, again, because the show is also about Fox – sorry, Henry – and his family: his wife, his daughter and his two sons. Most of the second episode thinks it’s Modern Family, with the kids up to various anctics involving mistaken lesbianism and trying to hit on girls, while Henry gets a crush on the hot upstairs neighbour (played by Henry – sorry, Fox’s – wife Tracy Pollan) and his on-screen wife (Betsy Brandt) tries to be understanding about it.

It’s all very confusing. As a result, the one thing it should be – funny – seems to have got lost along the way. While it’s educational, heart-warming, intelligent and a whole lot of other worthy things, the whole “laughing” thing seems to have been forgotten about in the mad rush to put together a show about Michael J Fox called The Michael J Fox show that isn’t simple a show about Michael J Fox but yet still is.

Fox is engrossing. Pierce is as great as always. The Henry family is well drawn. The show is well meaning.

But laugh out loud funny it ain’t. You’ll laugh a bit for sure. But only a bit. One to watch if you like Fox or want to learn a bit about living with Parkinson’s. For actual laughs or anything very innovative, you’ll have to look elsewhere, I’m afraid.