Trailer time: Elementary, from London, England

Here’s a trailer for the new season of CBS’s Elementary. Sean Pertwee seems to be having fun as Lestrade and they seem to be going for a louche Rhys Ifans, rather than a more sophisticated Ifans, as Holmes’ brother Mycroft.

BTW, I always love the way American announcers have to specify “London, England”, just in case we thought it might be London, Ontario, they were talking about. Canadian announcers get a pass, obviously.

[via]




  • JustStark

    I always wanted to make a movie set in Lincolnshire with a big opening caption that just says 'Boston'.

    And then for one scene send the characters to 'Los Angeles, California, United States of America'.

  • JustStark

    I always wanted to make a movie set in Lincolnshire with a big opening caption that just says 'Boston'.

    And then for one scene send the characters to 'Los Angeles, California, United States of America'.

  • Mark Carroll

    It is funny watching American newscasts wherein it's always “Paris, France”. (I can't remember how London was.) I used to live in one of Ohio's Paris townships; Ohio also has London, Oxford (home of Miami University!), Cambridge, Dublin, Vienna (pronounced differently), I'm sure others too that I'm forgetting.

  • Adam Bowie

    I think the whole two-part location thing is down to Americans mostly using the form “city, state”. And since a city might be quite small, and the country is quite big, it's the state bit that really identifies where you come from.

    But it does stick. I remember years ago, aged about 15, doing the NBC studio tour in New York, where we were all asked our names and where we were from. Everyone else was dutifully saying things like “Miami, Flordia” or “Charleston, North Carolina”. And I'd watched enough US television to know that my response should be “London, England” which is what I said.

  • JustStark

    'Destination Bangor, Maine'.

    Though even the real one gets confused with some little place in Wales, despite only one having been on the map since 1300.

  • Didn't we have a lovely time the day we went to Bangor, Maine?

  • I said 'London, UK'. The guy I spoke to said, 'Oh, Israel'. Not sure whether he was geographically challenged or I just needed to talk louder. The key to being understood in the US is simply to talk louder, I find

  • JustStark

    So same as with all foreigners who don't speak English, then?

  • You'd think. Ironically, Americans are the only people I use the 'speak louder' thing on in order to get understood; everyone else I just speak whatever they speak as best I can in normal tones and it doesn't seem to be a problem.

  • JustStark

    Which reminds me: did anyone ever mean Cambridge, Gloucestershire?

  • Mark Carroll

    Even in private homes the average American volume for conversation is indeed louder than in Britain. Of course, there are plenty of exceptions, including a nice lady from Wisconsin I saw today, but in terms of social expectations there is plenty of normal conversation there that is loud enough that in Britain it would make others turn and look.