US TV

Review: The Neighbors (ABC) 1×1

The Neigbors

In the US: Wednesdays, 8.30c/7.30c, ABC
In the UK: Not yet acquired by anyone in the world except Canada

What’s the funniest thing in the world? In the whole wide world? Go on. You know the answer. No?

It’s foreigners, of course. Foreign people who don’t know our ways and customs. Maybe they have an accent or don’t know how to use a hosepipe correctly.

That’s comedy gold, right there, that is.

Now, there’s a theory that when the economy is bad, people like escapist TV. And with networks currently trying to capture in a bottle the magic that made some of their – and other networks’ – previous hits so popular so they can pour it into a whole new set of shows, what better plan for ABC, home of Modern Family, Suburgatory and The Middle, than to create yet another show set in suburbia, except with some escapist foreigners to laugh at instead of Americans: in this case, aliens with English accents who own an entire street in the middle of suburbia, until two of them move out and a human couple from New Jersey move in.

Yes, aliens. The ultimate foreigners. Comedy platinum, right?

Ignore the fact that “aliens live next door to us in suburbia” was The Coneheads. Ignore the fact that “normal person moves into a strange neighbourhood and discovers it’s full of sci-fi weirdos” is both Eureka and ABC’s own The Gates. Ignore the fact that these aliens and everything about them are basically the same, bar the accents, as the ones from Galaxy Quest.

Ignore those facts and focus on this: The Neighbors is comedy gold that you bought from a pawn shop, only to discover it was really electroplated nickel.

That bottle of magic? Floating down a river towards Fox, right now.

Here’s a trailer.

Continue reading “Review: The Neighbors (ABC) 1×1”

US TV

Review: The Neighbors (ABC) 1×1

The Neigbors

In the US: Wednesdays, 8.30c/7.30c, ABC
In the UK: Not yet acquired by anyone in the world except Canada

What’s the funniest thing in the world? In the whole wide world? Go on. You know the answer. No?

It’s foreigners, of course. Foreign people who don’t know our ways and customs. Maybe they have an accent or don’t know how to use a hosepipe correctly.

That’s comedy gold, right there, that is.

Now, there’s a theory that when the economy is bad, people like escapist TV. And with networks currently trying to capture in a bottle the magic that made some of their – and other networks’ – previous hits so popular so they can pour it into a whole new set of shows, what better plan for ABC, home of Modern Family, Suburgatory and The Middle, than to create yet another show set in suburbia, except with some escapist foreigners to laugh at instead of Americans: in this case, aliens with English accents who own an entire street in the middle of suburbia, until two of them move out and a human couple from New Jersey move in.

Yes, aliens. The ultimate foreigners. Comedy platinum, right?

Ignore the fact that “aliens live next door to us in suburbia” was The Coneheads. Ignore the fact that “normal person moves into a strange neighbourhood and discovers it’s full of sci-fi weirdos” is both Eureka and ABC’s own The Gates. Ignore the fact that these aliens and everything about them are basically the same, bar the accents, as the ones from Galaxy Quest.

Ignore those facts and focus on this: The Neighbors is comedy gold that you bought from a pawn shop, only to discover it was really electroplated nickel.

That bottle of magic? Floating down a river towards Fox, right now.

Here’s a trailer.

Continue reading “Review: The Neighbors (ABC) 1×1”

Friday’s “Jeffrey Archer TV series, William Hurt to play Richard Feynman and Citizen Khan gets a 2nd series” news

The Daily News will be back on Tuesday

Film

Theater

Canadian TV

International TV

UK TV

US TV

US TV casting

New US TV shows

  • ABC buys heist drama from 24‘s Evan Katz
  • NBC developing New Orleans marching band comedy The Swamp
  • Gale Anne Hurd developing adaptation of Jeffrey Archer’s The Eleventh Commandment for NBC
  • NBC buys This Thing Called Love
  • Fox buys buddy-buddy-buddyette cop show from House and Rescue Me creators
  • CBS buys medical drama from Reaper creators
  • Medium’s Glenn Gordon Caron sells Motor City Shakedown and Near Dead to CBS

New US TV show casting

Thursday’s “Modern Wuthering Heights, Red Dwarf X clips and Michael McKean and Christopher Guest reunited” news

Film

Trailers

  • Trailer for Identity Thief with Jason Bateman and Melissa McCarthy
  • Trailer for Stoker, with Mia Wasikowska, Matthew Goode and Nicole Kidman

UK TV

US TV

US TV casting

New US TV shows

New US TV show casting

  • Fred Willard, Michael McKean and Ed Begley Jr join Christopher Guest’s Family Tree
The Weekly Play

The Wednesday Play: In Camera (1964)

In Camera

Time for a little bit of culture. Hell, it has been remarked, is other people. In fact, it was Jean-Paul Sartre who remarked that – kind of – in his 1944 existentialist play Huis Clos. ‘L’enfer, c’est les autres’ as is actually remarked is a bit more involved than the literal idea of the nasty afterlife being spending eternity with others, but that is exactly what happens in Huis Clos, in which three damned souls, Garcin, Inès and Estelle, are brought to the same room in Hell by a mysterious valet. There they discuss the crimes that resulted in their damnation, and things escalate before their final realisation of the nature of their torment.

In 1964, director Philip Saville, who went on to win a BAFTA for Boys from the Blackstuff, adapted and directed Stuart Gilbert’s English-language version of Huis Clos for The Wednesday Play as In Camera – ironically, the closest ‘English’ translation you’re going to get of Huis Clos. And you want to know who starred in it?

Only Harold bloody Pinter, that’s who.

Enjoy!