A shiny graph showing you from which countries Netflix’s content comes

The EU’s currently proposing a mandate for online services including Netflix and Amazon Prime to include more EU content. If this means more continental European content on Netflix and Amazon, I’m all for it. If it means more UK content, boo!

Anyway, the proposals include:

  • Allowances for member states options to impose financial contributions to on-demand services.
  • On demand service must ensure that a minimum share of European content is represented.
  • On demand services must also give European content ‘prominence’ meaning changes to user interfaces and recommendation engines.
  • Small companies “with no significant presence” and social media sites should not be subject to changes.
  • Provisions were also added increasing measures to protect minors from harmful content.

Where does Netflix’s content currently come from, though, you might ask? Here’s a graph. It’s sort of a graph anyway. I think it would have taken about three seconds’ thought to come up with a way of making it clearer, though.

But the general gist is that on the right-hand side, you can see in descending order of hours of content the countries producing the TV and movies on Netflix; in case your grasp of EU member states needs help, the grey and blue lines are an attempt to show you which are non-EU countries and EU countries respectively.

It’s not hugely surprising, given the strength of all the different countries’ respective media industries and Netflix’s English-language bias, but I’m surprised Turkey at least didn’t manage to hit the list at all.

Graph: Netflix Content by Origin (duration) 

Source: IHS Technology

Author

  • I’m Rob Buckley, a journalist who writes for UK media magazines that most people have never heard of although you might have heard me on the podcast Lockdown Land or Radio 5 Live’s Saturday Edition or Afternoon Edition. I’ve edited Dreamwatch, Sprocket and Cambridge Film Festival Daily; been technical editor for TV producers magazine Televisual; reviewed films for the short-lived newspaper Cambridge Insider; written features for the even shorter-lived newspaper Soho Independent; and was regularly sarcastic about television on the blink-and-you-missed-it “web site for urban hedonists” The Tribe. Since going freelance, I've contributed to the likes of Broadcast, Total Content + Media, Action TV, Off The Telly, Action Network, TV Scoop and The Custard TV.