• Hebbie

    Oh, make it stop! My ears are bleeding!! But I love how he can’t stop himself from walking on the furniture. 🙂 (Also, I now understand poor Hugh Laurie a little better and his agonizing over Americanish).

  • Yep, we’ve seen it 😉 and yes the accent is… not fabulous… but we loves him – especially for walking on furniture…

  • Mark Carroll

    Mmmm, the accent’s rather horrifying, poor man. I hope he gets better. Not many manage to swing from Brooklyn to Iowa quite so quickly!

  • I think he was trying to do a Chicago accent but forgot about the changes to the R’s. I’m pretty sure he’ll get better at it, usually it’s a matter of hooking up with the right accent coach.
    If he needs to learn “slightly higher pitched former NY-er living in CA” I’m more than happy to teach him.

  • ML

    It deserves to be noted that NO TIME was the accent an issue for ANY professional reviewer who saw the NBC Publicity DVD (and trust me, I scoured the internet for info!). It has ONLY been an issue for fans doing an unfair comparison/contrast based on David Tennant’s previous work.
    It is rather selfish that fans are judging this entire pilot based on a 1:20 clip on the internet, ignoring the fact that there’s 23+ more minutes of footage yet unseen, AND that they are continually harping on about an accent which was 1) learned in the U.K. and 2) something he had no time to refine, as the actor was only in the U.S. for a little under a month. If he was taught a Chicago accent back in London, then the script change from Chicago to Los Angeles left him a mere two or three days (at best!) from the time he landed in L.A. to try and change the tone of his voice prior to filming. No actor could accomplish that kind of miracle.
    Also, the 1:20 clip was designed to highlight the acting of Lindsay Kraft (Sophia), NOT David Tennant. It is therefore not his best scene or one that should be held up as an example of either what he can do or of the finished product. Plus there was at least one line recorded in post-production, making that line sound different than the rest of the dialogue.
    Speaking of the finished product, this was a PILOT and must be remembered as such–not a highly-polished film or even a well-practiced, multi-season TV show. It was made as an example, a test run, to see if the series had legs. Just as people are reviewing the tech screening of “Fright Night” at the moment, it must be kept in mind that both “Rex” and “Fright Night” cannot be viewed as refined, finished products or harshly judged by those who might be unfamiliar with the technical side of production.

  • SK

    Is that David Tennant commenting under an assumed name?
    And if so, is he sitting while he’s doing it?

  • SK

    Is that David Tennant commenting under an assumed name?
    And if so, is he sitting while he’s doing it?

  • Mark Carroll

    I don’t think that anybody here purported to be judging the “entire pilot” or seemed to accuse David of culpable negligence; you’re perhaps reading between the lines to see criticism that isn’t actually here, or projecting criticism you’ve seen elsewhere? Whatever the reasons, the clip does plainly evince a failed attempt at the accent that is so unfortunately obvious that it shouldn’t be at all surprising if people comment on it, but I’m really not seeing here any implicit, “therefore David’s rubbish and the show’ll be unwatchable” addendum that you seem to be inferring from somewhere. For instance, if it’s any consolation, if the reviews are reasonable and the show goes far enough I expect we’ll be giving it a try in our household.

  • MediumRob

    “if the reviews are reasonable and the show goes far enough I expect we’ll be giving it a try in our household.”
    It was for the 2010-11 season and didn’t get picked up. Although pilots can get picked up for subsequent seasons, even by other networks (cf Breakout Kings), it’s unlikely Rex is going to get resurrected – it’s basically a dead show.
    And for MK, few pilots ever get reviewed by professional TV critics until they’re picked up for series because it takes time to watch them and time to review them and unless they actually get watched by the public at large, that’s a lot of work for an audience of practically zero. And if they don’t get picked up, there’s usually a reason so why waste your time on something that networks didn’t think was good enough to turn into a TV show? There are only a few pilots, I think, that achieved some degree of fame as having been quite good but still didn’t get made (eg Global Frequency with Michelle Forbes, based on a Warren Ellis graphic novel).
    Equally, I’ve watched a fair old few preview pilots in my time and there’s often changes made to the pilot that mean you end up having to watch the first episode anyway (eg Hidden Palms lost a sub-plot about one couple’s sex life, Tru Calling lost an additional games designer character). So I’ve largely stopped bothering both watching and reviewing them as well.

  • Mark Carroll

    Ah, thank you, I had missed or forgotten that the show had died in birth.
    When we walk around places like the Las Vegas Strip there are television people wanting to pull us in to watch pilots and suchlike and somehow provide them feedback. It seems bizarre to me: I expect to be paid well for having to do something as awful as sitting through something that’s probably so bad it won’t even make it through one season as an American sitcom, but people around me seem always all too eager to volunteer to interrupt their pleasure trip for such a grisly task.

  • MediumRob

    “When we walk around places like the Las Vegas Strip there are television people wanting to pull us in to watch pilots and suchlike and somehow provide them feedback. It seems bizarre to me: I expect to be paid well for having to do something as awful as sitting through something that’s probably so bad it won’t even make it through one season as an American sitcom, but people around me seem always all too eager to volunteer to interrupt their pleasure trip for such a grisly task.”
    In Vegas? Mentalists. What are they even doing there?
    I also realised I neglected to point out to MK that pilots are usually intended to be airable. Sometimes, when reviewers get them, they lack certain things like CGI or incidental music (I remember an entire season where every single pilot used The Bourne Identity’s incidental music as a placeholder). But unless the networks decide there’s something wrong with the pilot (eg cast, plot, etc), the idea is that that those last few things (if there’s anything still to be done) can be be fixed in post before it goes out. Reshoots and even re-edits are bad. The Heroes pilot was pretty much identical to the one that aired, for example (although reviewers ended up with only the first episode, so didn’t get to see Greg Grunberg at all).
    In fact, you can be fooled by pilots into thinking some things are intended as rough when they’re actually going to go into the pilot. I remember watching the pilot episode of Fringe (cost of pilot: $10 million. You can bet that wasn’t intended as a ‘rough around the edges’ sample) and thinking that the 3D text they use for placenames was some CGI placeholder text whipped up in a couple of minutes for the pilot. Then the first episode airs, absolutely identical in every detail (IIRC) to the pilot, and the placenames are still all done in that rubbish 3D font…

  • SK

    Following that link… Rex is Not Your Lawyer has a fan site? A fan site for a programme that was never even on TV? Not even one that was prematurely cancelled, but on that was never even aired (has anyone, reviewer or not, seen any more of Rex is Not Your Lawyer than that clip?
    The world is a very strange place nowadays.

  • ML

    “Rex Is Not Your Lawyer” was the first major writing project from the guys that won Bravo’s “Situation: Comedy” competition–Andrew Leeds and David Lampson. It was first purchased by NBC from BermanBraun in 2007.
    The website and the research that I did on it (subsequently released as an e-book) were done with the goal of explaining and encompassing the history of the development process for American sitcoms… only, NBC’s policy is not to discuss undeveloped pilots. So I ended up with over 100 pages of research information on the show, on the “Doctor Who” connections to “Rex,” and nowhere to put it.
    This COULD have been a great moment to provide insight into how TV pilots come into being, develop and ultimately fail, but the network wouldn’t permit me the opportunity to do so much as interview location managers.

  • ML

    And yes, I have seen the pilot of “Rex Is Not Your Lawyer”–in my call out to people as I fought to get information on the show, someone took pity on me and let me watch it (let me restate that: WATCH it, not OWN it!).
    Again, bearing in mind that it was merely a pilot, it was fine. It was cut down from the original script considerably, which is a shame; if left intact and made as a pilot for cable, it would’ve done better.
    What this show offered above all else was the opportunity for up-and-coming actors to play the part of Rex’s clients. Potential new talent that could’ve gotten meaty roles and graced our screens in “Rex” lost out on that golden prime-time TV opportunity.

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