How do you help someone catch up with Lost?

Lost is now up to its fourth season. It’s actually a very good season, so far, and the flash-forwards/time travelling/boaties are working very nicely so far. In fact, I reckon it’s probably the best season of them all.

So the question is, given it’s good now, how do you help people catch up with a show like Lost? There have been getting on for 60-70 episodes, I reckon (without any research). That’s a lot of days of TV viewing for anyone to watch every single episode so far.

Do you just show the curious all the episodes and hope they have the time? Do you get them to rent the box sets one at a time until they’ve caught up? Can they skip seasons – is season two relatively missable, given that all the new characters introduced are dead now (more or less)? Or is there a cheat sheet of redundant episodes somewhere that have unimportant flashbacks and mere padding?

The trouble is what’s padding to one person is glorious happiness to another – after all, the “Nikki and Paolo get buried” episode looks like padding at first, but it explains a lot in retrospect and is wonderfully dark yet silly (Billy Dee Williams!).

Any ideas? Or should the uninitiated simply have put the time in when it was all the craze?

Advertisements
Advertisements

The new reviews A-Z

Well, the blog’s been going for a few years (two and a half) now and since a good proportion of it has been reviews, I’ve built up a fair old count: about 500, give or take, including third-episode verdicts, et al.

This can make it a little harder for y’all to find things than I’d like. After all, I do preview and review many new US shows quite some time before they make it across the pond: Dexter, season one, started last Wednesday on ITV1 (it’s already been on FX), a bit over a year after it aired in the US; and Mad Men started on BBC4 last night, six months after it first aired overseas.

There’s the complete archive, the search engine and tagging here, of course. But even if the show’s virile enough to have merited a tag, quite a few articles can get tagged relatively quickly (Dexter‘s chalked up 30 so far, while Mad Men’s chalked up 13), which makes finding the review a bit of a chore.

There have been complaints.

So, after building a rudimentary lathe and after an hour or so of clanging round the back, I’ve put together the Reviews A-Z, a simple index of all the reviews and (almost) nothing but reviews, sorted by title in alphabetical order.

It seems to work all right, although it does make me wish I’d been a bit more rigourous in my naming conventions, a whole lot sooner, but it should be of help. You can always find it at the bottom of the reviews list in the ‘Reviews’ tab to the right – yes, the grey bit under the “Featured Articles” bit and above the “Recent Videos”.

Let me know if you find any problems, or if you hate it. Or if you can’t find it. Oops.

Advertisements

The new reviews A-Z

Well, the blog’s been going for a few years (two and a half) now and since a good proportion of it has been reviews, I’ve built up a fair old count: about 500, give or take, including third-episode verdicts, et al.

This can make it a little harder for y’all to find things than I’d like. After all, I do preview and review many new US shows quite some time before they make it across the pond: Dexter, season one, started last Wednesday on ITV1 (it’s already been on FX), a bit over a year after it aired in the US; and Mad Men started on BBC4 last night, six months after it first aired overseas.

There’s the complete archive, the search engine and tagging here, of course. But even if the show’s virile enough to have merited a tag, quite a few articles can get tagged relatively quickly (Dexter‘s chalked up 30 so far, while Mad Men’s chalked up 13), which makes finding the review a bit of a chore.

There have been complaints.

So, after building a rudimentary lathe and after an hour or so of clanging round the back, I’ve put together the Reviews A-Z, a simple index of all the reviews and (almost) nothing but reviews, sorted by title in alphabetical order.

It seems to work all right, although it does make me wish I’d been a bit more rigourous in my naming conventions, a whole lot sooner, but it should be of help. You can always find it at the bottom of the reviews list in the ‘Reviews’ tab to the right – yes, the grey bit under the “Featured Articles” bit and above the “Recent Videos”.

Let me know if you find any problems, or if you hate it. Or if you can’t find it. Oops.

Advertisements

Monday’s Kung Fu master news

Film

British TV

US TV

Advertisements

Arcadia: from the makers of The IT Crowd

Sounds a bit sh*t, but you never can tell with SRO’s marketing evil. Plus it has a good pedigree (‘from the makers of The IT Crowd,’ they say. Who’s that? The writers? The cameramen? The people who press the DVDs?)

ARCADIA

Arcadia is a youthful sitcom set in the real world around Clacton’s finest computer games shop Games 4 U with a cast of characters whose minds are somewhere else entirely…

The shop is in financial trouble and ever-so-slightly neurotic manager Tony (Edinburgh Fringe Award winner Nick Mohammed) is doing his best to keep things afloat, ably assisted by Mr Sci-Fi convention himself, Jeremy Stokes (Matt Green), and the attractive, though unobtainable, Bella.

Tony believes he can design games better than the ones he sells; the problem is all his ideas are rubbish. Jeremy has played and completed every computer game ever released while still managing to have a surprising amount of luck with the ladies. This is all the more remarkable considering Jeremy regularly arrives for work dressed as gaming characters no one else has heard of. Bella is the gorgeous level-headed young assistant and the apple of Tony’s eye but unfortunately she is more interested in the mysterious hacker Clint who masquerades as an asexual-cyber-terrorist but is in fact a nice middle-class boy who still lives at home with his mum.

If you would like to join us for a night of comedy for ONE NIGHT ONLY on Saturday 8th March at 7.00pm then apply now! The minimum age for audience members is 16 years.

You can apply online at www.sroaudiences.com. Filming’s at the BBC TV studios in White City.