Sitting Tennant

Monday’s Sitting Tennant (week 13, 2010)

Sister Chastity's Sitting Tennant

It’s Monday and Sitting Tennant is back on its normal day for all of a week again – it’s Good Friday/Bank Holiday Monday in the UK this weekend, so Sitting Tennant will be back on Thursday/Tuesday next.

This Monday’s picture, however, comes from Sister Chastity. Poor David.

  1. Rullsenberg: 80
  2. Sister Chastity: 70
  3. Erin C: 65
  4. Toby: 60
  5. Sabine: 55
  6. Karen, Rachel: 35

In caption land, there was some fierce competition but it was the Liddell-esque Marie who got the 10 points this week with her slightly dirty first caption – she’s clearly found my level.

Five points as always to everyone else and good luck with this week’s competition.

  1. Rullsenberg, Toby: 55
  2. Jane Henry, Electric Dragon, Marie: 45
  3. ecg: 35
  4. Rachel: 25
  5. Sabine, SK: 20
  6. kellyann06, Sister Chastity: 10
  7. whogal, Joe B: 5

Got a picture of David Tennant sitting, lying down or in some indeterminate state in between? Then leave a link to it below or email me and if it’s judged suitable, it will appear in the “Sitting Tennant” gallery. Don’t forget to include your name in the filename so I don’t get mixed up about who sent it to me.

The best pic in the stash each week will appear on Monday and get ten points; the runners up will appear on Friday (one per person who sends one in) and get five points.

You can also enter the witty and amusing captions league table by commenting on Monday’s Sitting Tennant photo, the best caption getting 10 points, everyone who contributes getting five points.

If Saul Bass had made trailers for Tron and Star Wars – or a title sequence for Lost

Saul Bass was one of the most talented graphic designers of the 20th century. Although he only directed a couple of films, including Phase IV, he’s responsible for a number of the most iconic title sequences in movie history, including Psycho, Anatomy of a Murder, Spartacus and Vertigo. Here’s the titles from Anatomy of a Murder to give you an idea of his style:

Now people have been creating trailers and title sequences in Saul Bass’s style for other movies and TV shows. After the jump, trailers for Star Wars and Tron, and a title sequence for Lost.

Continue reading “If Saul Bass had made trailers for Tron and Star Wars – or a title sequence for Lost”

Monday’s “bye bye Jack” news

Doctor Who

Film

Theatre

British TV

US TV

US TV

Michael Chiklis and Julie Benz – together at last

Julie Benz and Michael Chiklis

Michael Chiklis (The Shield, Fantastic Four) and Julie Benz (Buffy, Dexter) are filming a superhero pilot together for ABC called no Ordinary Family, in which Chiklis plays a police artist who develops superpowers; Benz plays his wife, a gifted scientist who develops super speed.

As you do.

I’ll be watching it, for Benz at least, assuming it makes it to series. But here’s a pic from on set. Ain’t Twitter marvellous?

PS NBC, as well as potentially having Heroes still, is also working on The Cape, so that could be as many as three superhero shows on primetime, mainstream US TV in the Fall. How odd is that?

Classic TV

Weird old title sequences: Scarecrow & Mrs King (1983)

The Scarecrow and Mrs King

Which is stranger, do you think? The idea that once upon a time it was every American housewife’s dream to be whisked off her feet by a super-spy played by Bruce Boxleitner? Or that the US’s attempt to mirror the formula of The Avengers – male super-spy paired with talented female amateur – was Scarecrow and Mrs King, in which former Charlie’s Angel Kate Jackson, instead of playing an anthropologist or a millionaire industralist’s daughter, was a soccer mom?

Whichever was stranger, there was no denying the barn-storming appeal of the show, which aired on Channel 4 in the UK, starting in 1983. The plot saw the eponymous Amanda King, a divorced housewife who lives with her mother, Dotty, and her two young sons meeting Agency operative Lee Stetson, codenamed ‘Scarecrow’ one afternoon. He hands her a packet while he is being pursued, then later has to track her down to recover it, inadvertently getting her involved with his case.

Amanda tries to learn more about the Agency and ends up working for it, first in an office role and later training to become a full agent, while keeping her new job a secret from her family. Amanda and Lee work together frequently, though he is initially reluctant to work with the ‘rookie’, but they become a good team. As the series progresses, they develop a friendship that turns into a romantic relationship. Eventually they decide to marry, but they have to keep the marriage secret from their employer and their families.

Like The Avengers, Scarecrow and Mrs King was an escapist show with the same “will they, won’t they?” relationship between the two leads. Except of course, they did in the end. Unlike The Avengers, S&MK was relatively prosaic, more like Chuck, with few excursions into the weird and wacky, the focus being the contrast being the normal life of Mrs King and her exciting adventures with ‘Scarecrow’. Of course, no one ever died, was viciously tortured or captured by extremists, but that wasn’t the point. The point was for the viewer to imagine her life was like Mrs King’s and that she really could by a spy, too, if she wanted to, in between making the meals and picking the kids up from school.

The show lasted for four seasons and probably would have gone on for longer. Sadly, during the fourth season, Kate Jackson was diagnosed with breast cancer, reducing her role in that season and preventing a fifth season from getting the go-ahead.

Bruce Boxleitner, of course, had already been the star of Bring ‘Em Back Alive, went on to star in Babylon 5 and has had guest roles in Heroes and Chuck, to name but a couple of shows. He’ll also be reprising his role as Alan Bradley in Tron in the sequel Tron Legacy this year (no idea if he’ll play be playing the eponymous Tron as well); Kate Jackson now recurs on Criminal Minds.

I know the titles aren’t especially weird, but I think we’ve long passed that particular entry qualification, haven’t we? Here’s they anyway.

(As per usual when I’m in a rush, bits nicked from Wikipedia)