Tag Archive | CSI

239 result(s)

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80  

What have you been watching? Including Hamlet (NT Live/Barbican), Limitless and The Player

Posted on October 26, 2015 | comments | Bookmark and Share

It's "What have you been watching?", my chance to tell you what movies and TV I’ve been watching recently that I haven't already reviewed and your chance to recommend things to everyone else (and me) in case I've missed them.

The usual "TMINE recommends" page features links to reviews of all the shows I've ever recommended, and there's also the Reviews A-Z, for when you want to check more or less anything I've reviewed ever. And if you want to know when any of these shows are on in your area, there’s Locate TV - they’ll even email you a weekly schedule.

So I had a last minute 'Cumberemergency' on Friday, which meant that I suddenly didn't have the time to write 'What have you been watching?' Sorry about that, but hopefully, this will make it up to you.

Last week on the blog, I reviewed a big slew of first episodes from all manner of different countries:

And today I passed a third-episode verdict on BBC America/BBC Two's The Last Kingdom

That means that after the jump, you can find reviews of the latest episodes of 800 Words, Arrow, Blindspot, Crazy Ex-Girlfriend, CSI, Doctor Who, The Flash, Grandfathered, Limitless, The Player, Y Gwyll and You're The Worst. Yes CSI, since I finally got around to watch the final ever episode of that.

One of those shows is getting promoted to regular. Can you guess which one it is? Not CSI, obviously.

(Actually, I haven't managed to watch the very latest episodes of either Y Gwyll or The Beautiful Lie, because it's really Sunday and this is a scheduled post I'm writing before both of them have aired. I'll let you know about them next time.)

I did try to watch the first episode of Con Man as well. However, I gave up 5 minutes when it started becoming cringe comedy on the plane and Tudyk tried to get a fan to give up his seat for him. No extended music sequences in my TV shows, no cringe comedy in my comedies - those rules are sacred.

Anyway, let's talk about the 'Cumberemergency', since I was called upon at the last minute to accompany my mother-in-law to the theatre. Or was it a movie? Maybe it was both. Or neither.

Hamlet (The Barbican)
The National Theatre's latest version of Hamlet, performed at the Barbican and starring that Benedict Cumberbatch from off the telly. Except it was one of those NT Live things where they film the play as it's performed and beam it into cinemas everywhere. Except the cinema in question was at the Barbican, so they might as well have just knocked a hole in the wall and let us look through it.

Anyway, Hamlet's one of those plays where every director tries to make his or her mark by doing something radically different. The last version I saw at the Barbican was the Stephen Dillane (The One Game, The Tunnel, Hunted, Game of Thrones) one where he went naked for a scene. 

On top of that, Hamlet exists in three different versions, some which have scenes that aren't in the others. The result is that I always forget what's in the play and spend the whole time thinking "I don't remember this. Is this in the original?" 

In this version, our Benedict is playing a very bereaved, but generally good-egg Hamlet, who's a bit annoyed his mum's remarrying so soon after his dad died - except his dad's ghost reveals that actually, he was murdered. He doesn't get very pissed off like Mel Gibson or naked like Dillane, but does plot his revenge, all while his girlfriend goes super-loopy.

Unfortunately, the NT Live experience is basically the worst of both worlds. Despite my flippancy, the NT production does look very innovative, interesting and surprisingly funny, giving all the scenes genuine meaning. Bennie gives a great performance as Hamlet, making interesting choices such as the removal of any hint of sarcasm from the 'what a piece of work is man' monologue to make him a disappointed optimist rather than an embittered child-man. Siân Brook is marvellously barking as Ophelia. Ciaran Hinds's Claudius is the surprising weak link, straining to effect a Yorkshire accent for no discernable reason, but still a decent stage presence.

But any sense of theatre's immediacy is lost in the cinema. It looks nice, but you don't feel anything, because the actors aren't there on stage in front of you. Similarly, it's not cinematic enough, despite the director's best efforts to include crane shots and the like, for you to get the benefits of the directorial options and camerawork available to movies.

The play's split into two acts, the first 2h, the second 1h, and the first certainly feels the full 2h as a result of these problems. It's not the production's fault, it's simply a problem of the medium.

So don't do NT Live if you can. The play's the thing, after all.

Continue reading "What have you been watching? Including Hamlet (NT Live/Barbican), Limitless and The Player"

Read other posts about: , , , ,

News: Fantasy Island without the Island, Transporter fights Supergirl, US Braunschlag, new Daredevil trailer + more

Posted on October 13, 2015 | Post a comment | Bookmark and Share


  • Expendables 4 a go

Internet TV

  • Trailer for season 2 of Daredevil


New UK TV show casting

  • Mark Addy and Anna Chancellor join BBC One's New Blood


US TV show casting

New US TV shows

New US TV show casting

  • Dominic Fumusa, Antonio Jaramillo and Nadia Alexander join USA's The Wilding
  • Adrien Brody, Lorraine Bracco to guest, Kevin Corrigan to be a regular on Showtime's Dice
  • Chris Vance to play Non in CBS's Supergirl

Read other posts about:

Review: This Life 1x1 (Canada: CBC)

Posted on October 8, 2015 | Post a comment | Bookmark and Share


In Canada: Mondays, 9pm, CBC

There are certain themes for drama that are quite hard to base a series around, for the simple reason that they aren't really very enjoyable. Some ideas, particularly the more escapist ones divorced from real life, are fun to start with and it's up to the programme makers to see if they can make them less fun (eg travelling through space and time with an ancient alien in a police box that's bigger on the inside than on the outside); other ideas, particularly those close to home, are miserable and it's up to the programme makers to see if they can somehow entice viewers to watch.

Cancer's one of those topics that really has to woo viewers. If you don't believe me, try listening to one of the current crop of interviews with Toni Collette and Drew Barrymore as they try to explain how much buddy-buddy fun and 'girls night out' Miss You Already is, despite being about breast cancer.

Canada's This Life suffers from a similar problem. An adaptation not of the iconic 90s BBC Two show but of ICI Radio-Canada Télé's French-language show Nouvelle Addresse, it sees Torri Higginson (Stargate Atlantis) playing a 40-something single mother who writes a popular newspaper column about being a 40-something single mother (what's up with all the heroic 40-something parental newspaper columnists in the colonies, by the way?). 

She's a bit dull and consumed with her family, rather than herself, as younger, free spirited sister Lauren Lee Smith (The L Word, CSI, Good Dog, Mutant X, The Listener) is happy to point out to her. So she decides to carpe diem, perhaps even go out with that new high school principal who seems to be into her (Shawn Doyle from Endgame). 

Except then she discovers that the cancer that she'd thought had gone away six months earlier has returned, and this time it's terminal. She has less than a year to live. Now she needs to prepare her kids for when she's not around, while deciding how she's going to spend her final year on Earth.

Want to watch it yet? Of course you don't. It sounds miserable. And often it is. You'd practically have to be inhuman not to be weeping buckets when Higginson gets her diagnosis and prognosis.

This Life attempts to make itself more palatable in a number of ways. Firstly, it gives us Lauren Lee Smith. She boxes in her spare time and does the Walk of Shame so regularly, she even has spare dresses in her office. She's even toying with having a regular threesome with her latest one-night stand and his girlfriend.

Then there's Higginson's teenage children, who have their own things going on, involving boyfriends and girlfriends (or lack thereof), school work, squabbling, etc.

Still not persuaded? 

Fair enough. None of that is really that appealing or as fun as it thinks it is, either. Neither does This Life really establish in this first episode why you'd want to watch a show that ultimately is going to be about someone slowly and painfully dying, leaving her children alone. After depicting Higginson wanting to seize the day before she finds out her cancer is back, and then taking the 'gut punch' of the episode title that stops these plans in her tracks, it's unclear if she's going to properly seize the day for the rest of the series or simply start going to lots of lawyers and investment brokers to try to establish a legacy for her kids.

Maybe it'll be uplifting, maybe it'll be depressing, but given Nouvelle Addresse has lasted three seasons, I'll bet on option one. This Life also has a strong cast, with Higginson particularly good, and some good direction.

It's just it's a programme about someone dying of cancer, without much to relieve the pain. And that could be too close too home for a lot of people.

Read other posts about: ,

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80  

Featured Articles

The Art of More

More is less