This Country
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This Country renewed; Living Biblically cancelled; Charité acquired; Amazon’s Utopia remake; + more

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New US TV show casting

Let's Get Physical
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Seven Seconds, Taken cancelled; Let’s Get Physical acquired; This Close, six CBS shows renewed; Nat Geo’s Ebola drama; + more

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  • Teaser for season 2 of Netflix’s GLOW
  • Cary Elwes and Jake Busey join Netflix’s Stranger Things
  • Netflix cancels: Seven Seconds
  • Netflix green lights: series of Julian Fellowes invention of football drama The English Game; DJ comedy Turn Up Charlie, with Idris Elba; Amsterdam demon period drama; French supernatural thriller Mortel; German series The Wave; and Italian witchcraft series Luna Nera

UK TV

  • E4 acquires: Pop TV (US)’s Let’s Get Physical
  • Trailer for Sky Atlantic’s Patrick Melrose

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Ruth Wilson in Mrs Wilson
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The 20th Man, The Peripheral adaptations; Netflix enters The Order; BET, OWN, Comedy Central’s new shows; + more

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  • Netflix green lights: series of secret magic society monster drama The Order, with Jake Manley, Sarah Grey, Matt Frewer, Max Martini and Sam Trammell
  • Amazon developing: adaptation of William Gibson’s The Peripheral

Australian TV

UK TV

  • Iain Glen, Keeley Hawes, Fiona Shaw and Anupam Kher join BBC One’s Mrs Wilson

US TV

US TV show casting

New US TV shows

  • BET green lights: series of sexual chemistry app drama The Archer Connection and professional sports drama Games Divas Play
  • OWN green lights: series of multigenerational family saga Ambitions
  • Comedy Central developing: 20-something rapper comedy Awkwafina, overzealous church-league basketball comedy Robbie, and competitive friends comedy Kevin vs Josh
  • Paramount developing: police brainwashing drama
The Doctor Blake Mysteries
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US Wrong Mans; Doctor Blake without Doctor Blake; Netflix’s vampire wars; + more

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  • Mark Hamill and Kathy Bates to guest on CBS’s The Big Bang Theory

New US TV shows

  • ABC green lights: Goldbergs spin-off series with AJ Michalka, Tim Meadows and Bryan Callen
  • Pop green lights: pilot of best friends’ marriage of convenience comedy Arranged
  • Showtime green lights: pilot of adaptation of BBC One’s The Wrong Mans, with Ben Schwartz
Lost in Space
Internet TV

Boxset Monday: Lost in Space (season one) (Netflix)

In the past, I’ve fretted that today’s generations aren’t being educated in the TV classics. Back in the 80s, when there were just three to four channels, no Internet, no DVDs, no games consoles, no smartphones, et al, TV networks had a captive audience. So as well as making plenty of original shows, they could air repeats from decades earlier (sometimes even in primetime) and know the audience wouldn’t change channel or even turn the TV off. It ensured that the nerdy likes of me were introduced to The Man From UNCLE, The Avengers, The Invadersthe various ITC shows of the 60s, Champion the Wonder Horse, black and white sitcoms like The Addams Family or Car 54 Where Are You? and more.

The chances that any of today’s generation are going to watch these is pretty close to zero. Even if they wanted to, no channels are airing these old shows and few if any streaming services are offering them. There’s almost no chance they’ll get seen by the youth of today unless said youth have a lot of cash and patience.

Lost in Space

Lost in Space? Good

However, I have absolutely no concerns about the youth of today not getting to watch classic 60s sci-fi show Lost in Space. Produced by the famous TV auteur Irwin Allen (Land of the Giants, The Time Tunnel, Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea) and originally titled Space Family Robinson (kids: that’s a reference to a another thing we used to call ‘books’), it sees a family called the Robinsons blasting off into space in the then-far-flung-future of 1997 to colonise a planet around Alpha Centauri that’s fit for human life. However, their ship goes off course and before you know it, they’re… lost in space.

Why do I have no concerns? Because frankly – sorry, Lost in Space fans, if there are still any of you – it was terrible. Just awful, in fact. Forcing a child to watch it today is tantamount to abuse.

That isn’t just because of its patriarchal 60s values, with father Professor John Robinson (Guy Williams) and ‘Space Corps’ Major Donald West (Mark Goddard) going off doing action things and solving problems, while mum Maureen (June Lockhart) and daughters Judy (Marta Kristen) and Penny (Angela Cartwright) basically stayed at home and did the housework. It isn’t because of its shiny 60s idea of what space travel would be, either.

No, it’s because of what was actually the show’s most iconic character: one Dr Zachary Smith (Jonathan Harris). He wasn’t in the original pilot, but in keeping with other Allen series and the post-Bond fever for spy shows in the 60s, the show included Dr Smith for an element of international intrigue. In the new first episode for the show, he’s introduced as a saboteur whose presence on board the Jupiter 2 is what causes it to go off course. Never intended to last more than a few episodes before being written out, Harris soon hatched a cunning plan: he started writing his own lines and playing up his character as a colossal coward and pompous oaf.

Irwin was no fool and seeing what Harris was up to, he told him: “I know what you’re doing. Do more of it!” Before you knew it, ‘special guest star’ Jonathan Harris was in every single episode and was the star of the show. Most episodes were about him, his relationship with the Robinson’s very trusting son Will (Bill Mumy) and the almost equally iconic ship’s robot voiced by Dick Tufeld, whose catchphrase “Danger, Will Robinson!” is far better known than even the show itself, despite only having been used once.

To cope with a man screaming “Oh the pain! Save me, William!” as though he was being attacked by Puss in Boots every episode, the writers naturally shifted the tone of the show’s writing, taking it from a surprisingly gritty and even dark piece in its initial episodes to one in which actors were spray-painted silver and giant carrots turned up. Watch anything more than those first few episodes and you’ll discover that if you have any actual choice in terms of what’s available to watch, you won’t be watching Lost in Space unless you also happen to be smoking something a little exotic.

And now for something completely different

For reasons unknown, people had fond memories of the original show – presumably because they hadn’t watched it since they were three years old – and producers have been keen to tap into that misplaced nostalgia. In 1998, a movie version tried to turn the TV series into something watchable, but even the acting talents of the likes of Gary Oldman (as Dr Smith), William Hurt, Matt LeBlanc, Mimi Rogers, Heather Graham and Jared Harris still weren’t enough to save it. The less said about it, the better – particularly if you’re in the company of anyone who worked for a London post-production house at that time (“Oh the pain!” indeed).

An attempt to make a new TV series, The Robinsons: Lost in Space, floundered in 2004, despite John Woo directing the pilot. Apart from this YouTube video, the show’s only lasting mark were its sets, which were repurposed for the Battlestar Pegasus in Battlestar Galactica.

You’d have thought that given such a low bar to get over, any adaptation of the original could only succeed, but apparently not.

Third time lucky?

Nevertheless, here we are again, as Netflix has just given us a full 10-episode season of a show called Lost in Space that is ostensibly a reboot of the original show. It sees Toby Stephens (Black Sails, Die Another Day) playing dad John Robinson, Molly Parker (House of CardsDeadwood) playing mum Maureen Robinson and ‘queen of the indies’ Parker Posey playing Dr Smith, who once again are ‘lost in space’.

You would, of course, be quite entitled to wonder what sort of show this new Lost in Space would be like. If it’s an adaptation of the original, is it a remake of that original darkish spy show or the camp show it ultimately became? Is it more like the movie, perhaps? And is it a show for the kids or a grimdark piece for adults?

Last of all, is it actually any good and worth watching? Unlike the original.

While you’ll have to wait until after the jump before I tell you whether it’s any good, I can at least give you one of TMINE’s trademark ‘meets’ to give you an idea of the tone of the show.

Not only is it suitable for both adults and children, Netflix’s Lost in Space is indeed Lost in Space, but it’s Lost in Space meets Interstellar meets The Martian. Have a think about that while you watch this here trailer.

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