The Hitch-Hiker's Guide to the Galaxy
BFI events

What TV’s on at the BFI in September/October? Including The Bisexual, Butterfly and The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy

Every month, TMINE lets you know what TV the BFI will be presenting at the South Bank in London

We’re now up to the traditional weird BFI-only month of September/October. This is usually a time when there’s not much on, usually due to one film season or another. However, there’s actually a bumper range of programming. The main highlight is a season of archive shows and plays written by women, including the likes of Fay Weldon, but there are previews as well of the forthcoming The Bisexual and Butterfly, a reshowing of Fable, and May’s postponed event timed to coincide with the launch of The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy Blu-Ray has finally got itself a new date.

All that after the jump.

Continue reading “What TV’s on at the BFI in September/October? Including The Bisexual, Butterfly and The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy”

Bodyguard
BFI events

What TV’s on at the BFI in August? Including the rest of the Harold Pinter season, Langrishe Go Down, Bodyguard and Bollywood: The World’s Biggest Film Industry

Every month, TMINE lets you know what TV the BFI will be presenting at the South Bank in London

Not as jam-packed as July thanks to the summer holidays, August at the BFI still has a lot to offer. The Harold Pinter season continues on from last month, but there’s also two ‘Missing Believed Wiped’ sessions, celebrations of puppeteers Ivor Wood and Ray Harryhausen and previews of the forthcoming Bodyguard and Bollywood: The World’s Biggest Film Industry, complete with Q&As with cast and crew.

That’s after this week’s weekly play, Langrishe Go Down. Originally conceived for the cinema, and based on a novel by Aidan Higgins, this is a classic Harold Pinter work about passion, politics and class: in particular it shows his preoccupation with time and memory. Set on a run-down Irish estate, and cutting between the late and early 1930s, it charts a summer-long affair between a gentrified country girl and an exploitative Bavarian student. The cast is superb and the atmosphere distinctly Chekhovian.

No, I’ve not watched it. Yes, I have just copied and pasted that from the BFI guide. But I’m sure it’s great.

Continue reading “What TV’s on at the BFI in August? Including the rest of the Harold Pinter season, Langrishe Go Down, Bodyguard and Bollywood: The World’s Biggest Film Industry”

John Simm in ITV's Strangers
BFI events

What TV’s on at the BFI in July? Including a Harold Pinter season, Brownlow on Hollywood and a Strangers preview

Every month, TMINE lets you know what TV the BFI will be presenting at the South Bank in London

It’s Harold Pinter season in July, with wall-to-wall Pinter plays, including some which he acted in or directed as well. However, there’s also an episode of Brownlow on Hollywood from 1980, looking at silent movies, as well as a preview of ITV’s forthcoming thriller Strangers (formerly known as White Dragon), starring John Simm and Emilia Fox, who will also be attending a Q&A afterwards.

Details after the whole of Brownlow on Hollywood, if you’re intrigued by the history of US movie-making and have 13 hours to spare…

…or if you prefer it, Pinter’s The Birthday Party, in which he also appears, which is this week’s Weekly Play.

Continue reading “What TV’s on at the BFI in July? Including a Harold Pinter season, Brownlow on Hollywood and a Strangers preview”

Sydney Newman
BFI events

What TV’s on at the BFI in December 2017? Including Shada, The League of Gentlemen and the Sydney Newman season

Every month, TMINE lets you know what TV the BFI will be presenting at the South Bank in London

It’s the end of the year but it seems the BFI has saved the best for last. Following on from October-November’s bounty, we’ve got a whole host of TV events lined up for us in December. We do, of course, have the annual ‘Missing Believed Wiped’ event, which will be airing formerly missing episodes of Till Death Us Do Part and Late Night Horror.

However, the main season is dedicated to the marvellous Canadian TV producer Sydney Newman who so revolutionised British TV in the 50s and 60s. As part of that, we’ll be getting episodes of Doctor Who, Adam Adamant Lives!, The Avengers and Pathfinders, as well as two plays from the series he helped to create for ITV and the BBC: Armchair Theatre and The Wednesday Play.

Talking of Doctor Who, there’ll be a preview of the recently reconstructed (yet again) Douglas Adams story Shada, complete with animation replacement scenes for the bits that never got filmed. That’s among previews that include one of the new League of Gentlemen episodes, ITV’s forthcoming Hatton Garden, the Beeb’s new Agatha Christie adaptation Ordeal By Innocence and the latest David Walliams, Grandpa’s Great Escape.

Phew. Full details after the jump.

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Armchair Theatre: Red Riding Hood
The Weekly Play

The Weekly Play: Red Riding Hood (1973)

You can spend ages trying to work out the hidden meanings of fairy tales. Which Jungian archetypes do they reflect? Were they metaphors told by mothers to their children to explain the nature of patriarchy? Were they mere cautionary tales or did they have historical origins? And did Red Riding Hood really believe that wolf was her grandmother, just because it was wearing her clothes?

You can probably spend ages trying to work out what John Peacock’s Red Riding Hood means, too. A 1973 segment of ITV’s Armchair Theatre strand of plays, it sees Rita Tushingham playing a lonely librarian, struggling to deal with debt and her two bed-ridden relatives – her father and her grandmother. The red-clad Tushingham has little to live for, but one day the rather wolfish Keith Barron, who’s seen her down the library, decides he wants to get to know her. So he visits her grandmother, kills her with her own walking stick then waits for Tushingham to turn up.

After which, things get a little less easy to fathom when Tushingham agrees to spend a fortnight with him for a bit of spaghetti and sex, leaving her poor old dad by himself at home – despite her having more than an inkling of what Barron got up to before she turned up at grandma’s house in her red coat…

Does Red Riding Hood tame the wolf? I won’t spoil the ending for you, but metaphor mixes with reality, sub-text becomes text, and what’s real and what’s imaginary become hard to separate as the play progresses. Peacock, who also wrote the Hammer film Straight On ‘til Morning (which also starred Tushingham), enters similar territory to Dennis Potter’s Brimstone and Treacle here, but takes the plot in a completely different direction that’s all about Tushingham rather than Barron.

Red Riding Hood is this week’s play. I hope you enjoy it – if you like it, buy it on DVD to support the lovely people who made it.