Wonder Woman: Earth One #2
Weekly Wonder Woman

Weekly Wonder Woman: Wonder Woman #27

Yes, it’s Weekly Wonder Woman – keeping you up to date on pretty much anything involving DC Comics’ premier superheroine, including her baseball playing

Most of the talk at the weekend at this year’s SDCC was about the forthcoming Justice League movie, the Wonderful poster and trailer for which we looked at on Monday. However, there was some news about comics, too – mind-blowing, hey?

Top of the announcements was the revelation that there will indeed by a Volume 2 – and a Volume 3 – of Wonder Woman: Earth One, once again written by Grant Morrison and drawn by Yanick Paquette.

The story will see Nazis, led by Paula Von Gunter, invading Paradise island. It’s Amazons vs Nazis, and somebody is going to get punched!

But at a panel with little known DC publishers Dan DiDio and Jim Lee, while reflecting on the nu52, DiDio confirmed that at least one part of it was still in effect: Zeus is still Diana’s dad.

Told ya.

In other news, also as suspectedWonder Woman 2 is a go and it now has a release date: December 13 2019. More surprisingly, Patty Jenkins still isn’t confirmed to direct it. What’s going on there, hey?

What is confirmed about Jenkins is that she’ll be working with Steve Trevor Chris Pine again, this time on a completely unrelated TV project for TNT about Fauna Hodel. For those wanting to know a little more about this year’s other Wonder Woman movie, Professor Marston & The Wonder Women, there’s a Q&A with that film’s director for you to peruse, too.

But it’s nearly August, which means it’s time for Weekly Wonder Woman to become Not Until September Wonder Woman. Unfortunately, I’ve only one title to leave you with until then: Wonder Woman #27. Let’s chat about it after the jump.

Continue reading “Weekly Wonder Woman: Wonder Woman #27”

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Midnight, Texas
US TV

Review: Midnight, Texas (US: NBC; UK: Syfy)

In the US: Mondays, 10/9c, NBC
In the UK: Thursdays, 9pm, Syfy. Starts tonight!

Every so often, someone has the bright idea of taking all manner of previously separated supernatural beasties and sticking them together. Universal is trying it right now at the movies with Dracula, The Mummy, et al, with almost no success, but cast your mind back just a little bit and you’ll remember Sky/Showtime’s Penny Dreadful, which brought together the likes of Frankenstein, his monster, Dr Jekyll and Dorian Grey.

Cast your mind ever further back and you’ll hit HBO’s True Blood, which gave us a world populated by vampires and subsequently fairies, et al, as the series progressed, and when you hit 2010, you’ll come across The Gates, an almost forgotten ABC show about a gated community in which vampires, werewolves and the like all tried to co-exist peacefully, but usually failing miserably in the attempt.

Now NBC is giving it a whirl, this time by following the True Blood route of adapting a series of Southern-set Charlaine Harris books. Here, the eponymous Midnight, Texas is merely an informal point where over the years, all manner of “different” people have decided to settle down. As well as having its own Hellmouth™, there’s

  • An energy- and blood-sucking, blue-eyed vampire Peter Mensah (Spartacus)
  • Local vicar Yul Vazquez (Seinfeld) is a werewolf
  • Tattooist Jason Lewis (Sex and the City) is a fallen angel, albeit one who hasn’t gone to Hell
  • Parisa Fitz-Henley (Jessica Jones, Luke Cage) is a witch with a talking cat, albeit not a teenage one
  • Arielle Kebbel (90210) is a freelance assassin with no apparent special power other than to run around in a bikini with a bow and arrow
  • Potentially all manner of other, equally odd individuals

All seems quiet, even when the Sons of Lucifer are around. But then along into town comes psychic François Arnaud (The Borgias), persuaded by his fraudulent fortune-telling dead grandmother that he’s better off hiding out in Midnight, Texas, from whomever’s after him.

Unfortunately, just as Arnaud turns up, someone is murdered and before you know it, the police are investigating, sometimes with the help of Arnaud and his ability to speak to and raise the dead. Will they discover the town’s great big secret? And if they do, what will the denizens do to ensure their secret is kept safe?

Continue reading “Review: Midnight, Texas (US: NBC; UK: Syfy)”

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Tim Roth in Tin Star
BAFTA events

What TV’s on at BAFTA in July/August 2017? Including Tin Star, Tracy Beaker and Sinemaes 2017

Every month (more or less), TMINE flags up what TV events BAFTA is holding around the UK

BAFTA’s not got its act together as much as the BFI does, so a quick warning that if you want to see Tin Star, you’ll have to get your skates on, because they’re showing it tonight (they only emailed me about it yesterday – not my fault guv’nor!).

TV Preview: Tin Star + Q&A

Thursday 27 July 2017 – 18.45
BAFTA 195 Piccadilly, London

A preview of Sky’s new drama, which follows an ex-metropolitan detective starting a new life in a secluded town in the Rocky Mountains. Followed by a Q&A with actors Tim Roth, Oliver Coopersmith, Abigail Lawrie and writer Rowan Joffe.

Sinemaes at National Eisteddfod (Anglesey)

Friday 5 August – Saturday 12 August
Bodedern, Anglesey

For a second year, BAFTA Cymru will host a programme of screening and events at its Sinemaes tipi at the National Eisteddfod of Wales, a festival celebrating Welsh culture and language.

BAFTA at 70 Open Weekend: BAFTA Kids Event – Tracy Beaker

Saturday 5 August  – 11.00
BAFTA 195 Piccadilly, London

BAFTA and CBBC will be screening an episode from The Story Of Tracy Beaker; Tracy Beaker Returns and The Dumping Ground in celebration of the 15th anniversary of the series. Followed by a Q&A and meet-and-greet with cast and crew.

Prices

BAFTA Members/Guests: Free
Public: £7.50

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BBCs 1, 2 and 3 comedy pilots; Shooter shortened; Queen Sugar renewed; + more

Internet TV

  • BBC Three green lights: pilots of comedies Chinese Burn (with Yennis Cheung et al), Hailmakers (with Akemnji Ndifornyen and Samson Kayo), Wannabe (with Liz Brazier) and Enterprice (with Kayode Ewumi et al)

International TV

New UK TV shows

  • BBC One green lights: pilots of comedies Mister Winner (with Spencer Jones et al), Time Vine Travels Through Time and Static (with Rob Beckett)
  • BBC Two green lights: pilots of comedies The Other One and The Pact

US TV

US TV show casting

  • Li Jun Li joins Fox’s The Exorcist
  • Elizabeth Banks, Ed Begley Jr, Carrie Brownstein et al to guest on HBO’s Curb Your Enthusiasm
  • Mahershala Ali to star in HBO’s True Detective
  • Jaylen Moore promoted to regular, Nikolai Nikolaeff joins, Katherine Evans to recur on History’s Six
  • Breeda Wool to guest on NBC’s Midnight, Texas
  • Rachelle Lefevre and Missy Peregrym to guest on NBC’s The Night Shift

New US TV shows

New US TV show casting

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Pulse
Australian and New Zealand TV

Review: Pulse 1×1 (Australia: ABC)

In Australia: Thursdays, 8.30pm, ABC
In the UK: Not yet acquired

One of the best lines in this week’s episode of Will was “It’s 1589, Will – everything’s been done. It’s how you do it that counts.” I was reminded of this as I was watching Pulse, ABC (Australia)’s new medical procedural, as I tried to work out why it was so incredibly boring. It wasn’t for want of trying, certainly.

Based on an apparently true story, it’s the tale of high-flying financial analyst Claire van der Boom (Hawaii Five-0) who suffers kidney failure but receives a transplant so survives. She subsequently decides to retrain as a transplant doctor herself. Years later, she finds herself a trainee on the cardio-thoracic and renal wards of a major teaching hospital, learning how medicine actually works in practice. But as she’s still on immune-suppression drugs, any patient she meets could make her sick – she could make others sick, too.

So Pulse immediately gives you those three points of empathy – she’s a doctor but she knows what it’s like to be the patient as well; she’s determined to fight the patient’s corner, even if the more seasoned doctors are more calculating and blasé about the whole thing; and everything’s as life-threatening to her as it is to her patients.

On top of that, she’s both expert and trainee, so we have the tensions between those with the knowledge and experience and van der Bloom’s more impulsive tendencies. There are critiques of the Australian health system, including male dominance of the Australian surgical profession.

There’s co-worker Andrea Demetriades (Seven Types of Ambiguity) soft-porn shagging her boss, Blessing Mokgohloa (Spartacus: Blood and Sand). There’s her super-firey Welsh boss Owen Teale barking universal truths about healthcare – he’s also the man who gave her her transplant for a double-shocker.

Surprisingly, there’s even Spartacus himself and part-time weathermaster Liam McIntyre as an ex-soldier turned doctor and possible love interest for van der Bloom.

And that’s just the set-up – in the first episode, we’ve got people passing out after being sent home too soon, we have an organ lottery and we have transplant kidneys being snatched away at the last minute.

Much peril! Very wow!

And yet it’s absolutely tedious. Which brings us back to that line of Will‘s. It made me cast my mind back to when I last actually watched – and continued to watch – a procedural. On the medical side, it’s House; on the police side, it was the CSI franchise. I think in both cases it’s because they actually did something different, House being a combination of philosophy and Sherlock Holmes detective story, CSI being more like a series of scientific experiments. Everything since has singularly failed to grab my attention.

Which makes me think that I:

  1. Simply dislike procedurals.
  2. Like new things and constant repetition of the same format is intrinsically tedious to me
  3. Might not dislike procedurals when they’re actually something else in disguise

And despite throwing everything but the kitchen sink into the mix, Pulse is a meat-and-two-veg medical procedural, no different from Casualty, predictable, with nothing new to say that House et al hasn’t already said, no great and unusual new characters to love, no amazing performance to lift the show out of its rut (although Teale’s great, of course). It’s not terrible, it’s well made, plenty of people love that kind of thing. I just don’t like something where I can guess more or less everything that happens before it happens. I suspect you don’t either.