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Reviews of US television programmes


January 11, 2017

Review: Emerald City 1x1-1x2 (US: NBC; UK: 5*)

Posted on January 11, 2017 | Post a comment | Bookmark and Share

Emerald City

In the US: Fridays, 9/8c, NBC
In the UK: Acquired by 5*. Will air early 2017

Certain classics are sacrosanct. Everyone's agreed that whatever happens, you shouldn't remake them, reimagine them or whatever, since they will never be as good and might insult the memory of the original.

The Wizard of Oz isn't one of those things, it seems. Long is the list of reimaginings, it being a reimagining anyway of Frank Baum's book The Wonderful Wizard of Oz, several silent movies and a Broadway musical. At the theatre, it spawned the reimagined Wicked, one of the most popular musicals of all time. At the movies, we've had cartoons (Journey Back to Oz, Legends of Oz: Dorothy's Return), a sequel (Return to Oz) and remakes (The WizOz The Great and Powerful, The Muppets' Wizard of Oz).

On TV, dark, gritty, sci-fi reimaginings have been the order of business - once they've actually got off the ground. Tim Burton gave a pilot of one a go, back in 1999, but that never even got filmed. Lost in Oz, an action show sequel in the vein of Buffy and Smallville that starred Melissa George (Dorothy replacement) and Mia Sara (new Wicked Witch), managed to get as far as a pilot in 2002, but proved too expensive for a series:

Sara would still return as a witch in the later mini-series, The Witches of Oz, in which noted author Dorothy Gale discovers that her books are actually based on repressed memories of her time in the land of Oz:

But before that Zooey Deschanel, Neal McDonough, Alan Cumming and Raoul Trujillo - aka DG, Cain The Tin Man, Glitch and Raw - entered the Outer Zone (OZ) to find the Mystic Man (Richard Dreyfuss) in inept Syfy Channel mini-series Tin Man

Now we have possibly the most interesting and successful attempt to 'reimagine' The Wizard of Oz in the shape of NBC's 10-episode limited series Emerald City. As with previous TV shows, it had false starts: originally given the green light back in 2014, it got shut down when NBC and showrunner Josh Friedman had a bit of a spat. A year later, NBC changed its mind again, gave David Schulner the showrunner post and now, three years after that first go-ahead, here it is at last.

It sees young adopted Kansas nurse Adria Arjona (Person of Interest, True Detective) caught up in a tornado and conveyed to a strange new land, filled with witches both good (Joely Richardson) and bad (Florence Kasumba), as well as a mighty Wizard (Vincent D'Onofrio) who protects the land from the Great Beast Beyond. Will the wizard help her to return to Kansas or does he have a very different agenda on his mind, given all the power struggles going on in Oz?

It's The Wizard of Oz meets Game of Thrones, but most importantly of all, all 10 episodes are directed by Tarsem Singh (The Cell) and he's been to Barcelona. No, that's not a euphemism, oh friend of Dorothy.

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January 9, 2017

What have you been watching? Including Beyond, Sherlock, and Man Seeking Woman

Posted on January 9, 2017 | Post a comment | Bookmark and Share

It's "What have you been watching?", my chance to tell you what movies and TV I’ve been watching recently and your chance to recommend anything you've been watching. 

TV networks around the world are starting to crank into life, with a few old favourites returning to our screens and a few more new ones on their way this week (Canada - I'm looking at you here). That means that after the jump, as well as the latest episodes of Shooter and Sherlock, I'll be looking at the return of Lethal Weapon, Man Seeking Woman, and Son of Zorn.

I've not yet had a chance to watch NBC's gritty Wizard of Oz adaptation, Emerald City, from Friday, so I'll be reviewing that separately on Wednesday. But the other major newbie out last week was…

Beyond (US: Freeform; UK: Available now on Netflix)
A gender-swapped insipid amalgam of every other Young Adult sci-fi/fantasy show you've ever watched, whether it be Twilight or even Freeform's own Kyle XY, in which a young adult (Burkely Duffield in this case) discoveres he's very, very special for some arbitrary reason and both a skulking conspiracy and a band of goodies want to recruit him to their respective teams.

Here, the conceit is that Duffield was knocked out when he was 12 years old and since then has been in a coma. Except during that time, his disembodied consciousness went to another realm - unimaginatively called The Realm - something that's given him telekinetic/firestarting abilities. Waking up, he's pursued by a 'man in a yellow jacket' (Peter Kelamis), as well as a foreign-sounding 'ninja girl from The Matrix' (Dilan Gwyn), while having visions of an old man (Alex Diakun). Duffield not only has to recover his memories from that time in The Realm and try to escape those who would control him, he's also got to get used to the new world of cellphones, Wikipedia and being a 12-year-old in a 24-year-old's surprisingly unatrophied body. There's also all the changes in his family, with younger brother now effectively the elder brother and his parents having separated.

There are moments in Beyond - most of them in the pilot - where the show's almost cool, such as when Duffield uses his powers for the first time. There's also a sweet charm to Duffield's character, who tries to woo girls by talking about science and history, because that's all he knows about, having missed out on half his life. Kelamis's 'yellow jacket' is both sinister and amusing, and the introduction in episode 5 or so of a coma-girl with powers of her own was a welcome addition.

But I managed to sit through six episodes without finding anything much more than that, although maybe I should have held on a bit longer until Martin Donovan shows up as the Big Bad. There's not much danger, nothing too exciting about The Realm beyond a few dogs. Duffield's powers seem to consist of accidentally blowing things up a lot, which gets boring after a while. Gwyn is far less Trinity, far more Bella (but before she gets all cool and vampirey), constantly pining after Duffield but never actually doing much. 

The show also has a 24-year-old's memory of history. So while it's interesting we learn that US youth have in just 12 years gone from first making phone calls to talk to someone they like to texting them (something last week's Lethal Weapon touches on, oddly enough), everything else exists in an oddly timeless vacuum. While we're clearly in something like the present day, judging by the phones and the CSI:Miami-style floating displays and touchscreens behind invalids' beds, Duffield doesn't know about Apple Computers (iPod generation 2 released 2002) and his 12-year-old self had a bedroom adorned with original Star Wars and Empire Strikes Back posters. Meanwhile, Kelamis wears a pair of glasses straight out of 1988.

All in all, you're probably better off watching Shadowhunters, if you're going to be watching any YA fantasy shows.

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January 3, 2017

What have you been watching? Including The Mick, Sherlock, Mechanic: Resurrection, The OA and The Bureau

Posted on January 3, 2017 | Post a comment | Bookmark and Share

It's "What have you been watching?", my chance to tell you what movies and TV I’ve been watching recently and your chance to recommend anything you've been watching. 

Well hello. How are you today? Have a nice break away from it all? That's what I like to hear. 

Right, that's the small talk done. Let's talk telly.

So, I didn't watch an awful lot over the Christmas break, since I was actually in Germany and if you've ever watched German TV, you'll remember what a mistake that was (more about that tomorrow). But after the jump I'll be talking about the regulars I did watch, including the return of Doctor Who (briefly) and Sherlock (less briefly):

Global Internet
The OA 

UK
Doctor Who, Sherlock

France
Le Bureau des Légendes (The Bureau)

US
Shooter

However, New Year's Day was on Sunday and Americans being quite efficient, there have already been two new shows to grace the screens. I've already reviewed Ransom (US: CBS) but on top of that there was:

The Mick (US: Fox)
A gender-swapped, race-swapped Uncle Buck that sees It's Always Sunny In Philadelphia's Kaitlin Olson playing the white trash grifter sister to a billionaire's wife who gets lumbered with looking after the kids when the rich couple go on the run following fraud investigations. If she sticks around, she gets to enjoy the lifestyles of the rich and famous. But she'll also have to deal with the bitchy neighbours, the bitchy daughter and the entitled son.

The show's created by John Chernin and Dave Chernin, the creators of It's Always Sunny In Philadelphia, so you shouldn't be too surprised to hear that it's funnier than you might think, more accurate about being poor than you might think and also based around people being mean too one another verbally and physically in order to get one up on everyone else. Olson's very good as the Mick(ey) of the title and everyone is marvellously bitchy, too.

Except that's not my idea of fun, so I probably won't stick with it.

I also watched a movie.

Mechanic: Resurrection (2016)
Sequel in name only to the actually not that bad 2011 Jason Statham remake of the Charles Bronson/Jan-Michael Vincent actioner, The Mechanic. Here, Mechanic: Resurrection throws pretty much all the first movie's nuance aside in favour of a sort of melange of The Transporter, The Transporter 2 and The Internecine Project. No longer the meticulous hit-man planner of yore, Statham is retired in Brazil until fellow East End child army survivor (don't ask) turned billionaire bad guy Sam Hazeldine (Peaky BlindersResurrection) blackmails him into returning to his old life by abducting new girlfriend Jessica Alba. Only if Statham kills three of Hazeldine's impossible-to-reach rivals in ways that look like accidents will Hazeldine release Alba. He says.

Foresaking The Mechanic (2011)'s character building and steely professionalism, Mechanic: Resurrection is an insultingly stupid piece of work that tries to give us glossy backdrops, non-stop Statham fight scenes, a bit of ultraviolence and a bit of casual racism as a substitute, hoping we'll like it better. Certainly, the stars seemed to have liked it, because Alba's former Afghanistan soldier turned teacher of Cambodian children is an insult to women, but she does get to go to lots of tropical islands; Tommy Lee Jones gets more of the same travel action, but perhaps was also swayed by the chance to play a socialist arms dealer with a James Bond-style underwater base and submarine using all the subtlety he deployed in Under Siege; Michelle Yeoh was purely there for the tropical islands and not to have to do anything athletic for a change, as far as I could tell.

To be fair, most Statham movies take the piss a little bit and Statham is as aware of that as anyone. Certainly, the fact he takes his shirt off in almost every other scene can't be accidental and I refuse to believe that the FX shots were anything other than deliberate tributes to Derek Meddings' model work in 1970s James Bond movies. There's a certain amount of tongue going into cheek here.

But the writing is still terrible and worst of all, almost none of the murders Statham is supposedly hired to make look like accidents would pass as such for more than a minute. Terrible.

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