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News: Joss Whedon's Batgirl; Helen of Troy found; Game of Thrones trailer; + more

Posted on March 31, 2017 | Post a comment | Bookmark and Share

Film

Internet TV

International TV

  • Bella Dayne, David Threlfall, Frances O'Connor et al to star in BBC One/Netflix's Troy: Fall of a City
  • HBO (US)/RAI (Italy) green light: adaptation of Elena Ferrante's My Brilliant Friend
  • Mark Strong to star in Fox (Europe and Africa)'s Deep State (previously The Nine)

UK TV

US TV

US TV show casting

New US TV show casting

  • Tyler Labine to co-star in CBS's Hannah Royce's Questionable Choices
  • Britt Lower to recur on Hulu's Future Man
  • Jacqueline Bisset, Stefan Kapicic, Jacqueline Anaramian et al to recur on Starz's Counterpart

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Review: Iron Fist - Season 1 (Netflix)

Posted on March 24, 2017 | Post a comment | Bookmark and Share

Netflix's Marvel's Iron Fist

Marvel took the movie world by storm with The Avengers, a little film one or two of you may have seen. One of the most important aspects of The Avengers was the fact it wasn't the first movie to features its protagonists, all of whom had appeared in the preceding movies Iron Man, The Incredible Hulk, Thor and Captain America: The First Avenger, either as the leads or as co-stars.

A staple of the comic book world, the crossover was something that had never really been tried in the movie world before and audiences loved it.

With a few reservations. The most notable of these was that there wasn't a huge amount of diversity in that superheroic line up: lots of straight white men as leads and usually as the villains, too, but women, people of colour et al were either in the supporting cast or completely absent. And while the movies have slowly added black characters such as Falcon and Black Panther and bumped up the role of supporting superheroine Black Widow to the point where Captain America: Winter Soldier was as much about her as about Captain America, solo movies with black or female superheroic leads are still a little way off.

So, when Netflix and Marvel announced they would produce a series of comic book TV shows together, three things were almost compulsory. The first was lower budgets. That meant having none of the movie universe characters in any of the shows, which meant having to pick completely new characters. The second was that there would be crossovers, which in turn would lead to one great big TV series featuring all the new heroes. The third was diversity would be key.

And thus we have a new group of superheroes: 'The Defenders'. Not to be confused with 'The Avengers', obviously. The Defenders is also the name of the ultimate TV show at the end of the list.

The sequence started with Daredevil, a really superb opening featuring probably the one character many people would have heard of, thanks in part to the Ben Affleck adaptation over a decade ago. Daredevil's also blind and a lawyer who does pro bono work defending the poor and helpless from big business.

That was quickly followed up with the suprisingly excellent feminist deconstruction of the entire genre, Jessica Jones, and then Luke Cage, an affair almost plotless because rather than being a superhero show, it largely was more interested in discussing black culture, history and what is the true and correct course of action for the modern black man of honour. A quick second season of Daredevil proved less satisfying, as it ditched gritty reality to pit our hero against a bunch of immortal ninja called 'The Hand'.

All the same, for all their pros and cons, diversity - globs of it everywhere.

Which makes Marvel's Iron Fist something of an odd choice. Because although it fits well with Mark Zuckerberg's idea of diversity, it's almost a slap in the face to the other shows' efforts.

Young Danny Rand, the white male son of white corporate mogul billionaries, is on their private jet to China when it crash lands in the mountains of Tibet. Coincidentally, that's just as the mystical city of K'un-L'un appeared from heaven on its 15-year regular cycle, journeying between planes of existence. Taken in by the warrior monks who guard K'un-L'un, the orphaned boy is trained in their ways and eventually succeeds all trials to become 'the Iron Fist', K'un-L'un's 'living weapon' who uses the power of the heart of the Shou-Lao the Undying dragon, to defend the city from the Hand, whenever it appears on Earth.

However, when K'un-L'un returns to the Earthly plane again 15 years later, Danny abandons his post and heads to New York where he discovers the Hand are already in residence at his parents' company, Rand Enterprises. Soon, he must prove who he really is, take back his company from the bad people who now run it, and stop The Hand.

Yep, that's right: Iron Fist wants you to care about boardroom politics and a spoilt, immature billionaire who wants to clear his family name.

Bad decision by Marvel and Netflix? Well, actually, despite some very odd decisions, a very shaky start, and a very long list of flaws, Marvel's Iron Fist turned out to be really, really enjoyable stuff - due in part surprisingly because it features Sacha Dhawan (Outsourced24, The Tractate Middoth, Line of Duty, An Adventure in Time and Space) as a sarcastic warrior monk named after a Swiss ski resort.

Big spoilers after the jump…

Continue reading "Review: Iron Fist - Season 1 (Netflix)"

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News: The Halcyon cancelled; The 100, Good Karma Hospital, Schitt's Creek renewed; + more

Posted on March 13, 2017 | Post a comment | Bookmark and Share

Preacher - season 2

Canadian TV

UK TV

US TV

US TV show casting

New US TV shows

New US TV show casting

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