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What have you been watching? Including Legends, Dim Ond y Gwir, Arrow, 800 Words and Limitless

Posted on November 6, 2015 | Post a comment | Bookmark and Share

It's "What have you been watching?", my chance to tell you what movies and TV I’ve been watching recently that I haven't already reviewed and your chance to recommend things to everyone else (and me) in case I've missed them.

The usual "TMINE recommends" page features links to reviews of all the shows I've ever recommended, and there's also the Reviews A-Z, for when you want to check more or less anything I've reviewed ever. And if you want to know when any of these shows are on in your area, there’s Locate TV - they’ll even email you a weekly schedule.

Brace yourself - a new wave of TV shows is about to hit us, because we're about to hit the mid, mid US season, and Amazon and Netflix are busy hitting us with new pilots and new shows even as I type. So consider this a lull. 

Elsewhere this week, I've reviewed the first episode of Ash vs Evil Dead (US: Starz) and passed a third-episode verdict on The Beautiful Lie (Australia: ABC), which means that after the jump, I'm going to be talking about the season finale of Arrow, Blindspot, Doctor Who, The Flash, Grandfathered, The Last Kingdom, Limitless, The Player, Supergirl and You're The Worst, as well as the season finales of 800 Words and Y Gwyll. I also final caught up with the final few episodes of Strike Back

But that's not all I watched this week. I've also watched two new shows: Dim Ond Y Gwir and Legends. What do you mean Legends isn't new? Well, that's strangely debatable…

Dim Ond Y Gwir (UK: S4C - available on iPlayer)
Flush with the success of detective show Y Gwyll/Hinterland, S4C has decided to branch out into another genre: the courtdroom drama. Dim Ond Y Gwir (Only the Truth) is a half-hour weekly affair that follows 'law court workers as they go about their daily lives'. In the first episode, this amounts to watching various ancillary workers man the metal detectors, while someone in the cafe bakes a cake. Meanwhile, up in the courts themselves, we have barrister Rebecca Trehearn dealing with one case when it turns out that the opposite barrister is her ex-boyfriend! Oh noes.

Filmed in Caernarfon where it's actually not that uncommon for cases to be heard in Welsh, this is a pretty poor affair, with the supposed sexy ex more the kind of guy who sidles up to women when they're drunk in bars, almost no legal accuracy in the proceedings whatsoever, and the case hinging on whether Trehearn will bother defending her client if she thinks he's guilty or not (big reveal at the end that has no legal bearing!). The acting is also pretty dreadful, too, and the budget's probably about £3.50. Sorry, S4C - this one ain't going to go global.

Legends (US: TNT; UK: Sky1)
So, as we all remember, but are possibly wondering if we imagined it all, Legends was a very sub-par piece of US TV in which Sean Bean was the US's best undercover FBI agent, a human chameleon able to become whomever he wanted while his NCIS-style buddies back at home base helped him to overcome computer problems and the like, as he assumed a new identity every week. Unfortunately, Bean's personality might itself be a 'legend' and he's forgotten who he really is. Oh noes.

The big reveal at the end of the first season (look away for year-old spoilers) is that yes, Bean was really MI6 and that he'd lost his memory in an accident. The big problem is that he's then framed for murdering a top FBI director. Oops. 

'TNT - Bang'? Not really.

But in between seasons, the show changed showrunner and new boy Ken Biller (Perception) decided not just to change direction but perform a 'hard reset' of the entire show. Severely hard. Out of the show are everyone except Bean and Rosewood's Morris Chestnut (for a few episodes at least) - even Ali Larter, those cads. The entire show has also moved to Europe and now covers several timelines - Bean's upbringing at a rather nasty Northern public school in the 70s, undercover work in Prague in 2001 and two modern day storylines involving Bean's attempts to rediscover his old life in London and a new FBI agent's attempts to find him through the Prague connection. 

And it's just the weirdest thing. An almost entirely new show that feels like a British spy show, feels even like it's been written by a Brit (bar the swearing), but shot US-style. It's basically Homeland meets The Spy Who Came In From The Cold. I'm still reeling from the changes, they're so profound. It's now a really good spy show, although the plot about the radicalisation of young London Muslims is a bit trite, and Bean's character seems to have forgotten the whole 'best undercover agent ever' thing, judging by how much he's cocking up. 

All the same, despite the absence of our Ali (sob), even if you gave up on Legends the first time, give it a go this time round, since you might as well be watching a new show.

Would you believe it, I actually had some time to watch a couple of oldish movies, too.

Sherlock Holmes and The Secret Code (aka Dressed to Kill) (1946) (Amazon Instant Video)
One of the great things about growing up in the 80s was that BBC Two regularly used to show all the old Basil Rathbone movies at 6pm of an evening. Which was great. Seeing as Amazon Instant Video has quite a few of them to view for free, I thought I'd give Dressed To Kill a go. It's basically Conan's Doyle The Six Napoleons/Blue Carbuncle but with a set of music boxes that a set of villains are trying to get for some nefarious reason. The chief villain is basically Irene Adler except not: an actress who outwits Holmes and Watson, even reading A Scandal in Bohemia and his monograph on cigarette ash to find out Holmes' methods of operation and turning them against him.

There's not much detection, most of it being Rathbone just making lucky guesses, but it's fun and a lot smarter than you'd have thought for something pretty much cranked out post-War in a job lot.

Pacific Rim (2013) (Amazon Instant Video)
One of those movies where you look at who the writer/director is and go, "Really? I mean really?" Basically, Transformers meets the Godzilla movies but with the monster and biological horror that we do actually all associate with Guillermo Del Toro, it sees a bunch of giant monsters emerging from the sea to destroy the world's cities, but the world at a loss to respond until they think of sticking people in giant robots to punch them to death.

There's far more action than there was in the most recent Godzilla, it's got some interesting ideas and it's got Idris Elba as the leader of the plucky robot pilots, but it's very silly and to be honest, I'd rather have watched old episodes of Star Fleet instead, as they have more charm.

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Homeland is racist, says Homeland

Posted on October 15, 2015 | comments | Bookmark and Share

It's a problem that affects anyone who wants something written in a foreign language but doesn't speak the language himself or herself: how do you know what the translator has written is correct? You can get someone else to double-check it of course, if you have the time and budget, but most people just take the first translation and hope for the best.

But, of course, people make mistakes all the time. Or are just untrustworthy.

This sign in Swansea, for example, is a famous illustration of the problem:

A badly translated sign in Swansea

Someone who didn't speak Welsh needed a Welsh translation so emailed the English wording to the council translation department. They got an email back, assumed it was the translation and used that. Unfortunately, what the Welsh wording actually says is: "I am not in the office at the moment. Send any work to be translated."

The latest season of Homeland suffers from a similar but differently motivated problem. The series has earned itself a reputation in some quarters as being racist to Arabs. Unfortunately, despite being set in Berlin for the latest season, one scene needed to show a Syrian refugee camp. And the producers thought that meant there would be pro-Assad graffiti on the walls of the camp, so they commissioned some Arabic-speaking artists to write some suitable graffiti for them.

Unfortunately, the artists in question weren't impressed by Homeland so took a few liberties.

Homeland is racist

For those of you who don't read Arabic, that one says: "Homeland is racist."

Homeland is not a series

"Homeland is not a series", "The situation is not to be trusted", "This show does not represent the views of the artists".

One of the artists explained to The Guardian: "We think the show perpetuates dangerous stereotypes by diminishing an entire region into a farce through the gross misrepresentations that feed into a narrative of political propaganda.

“It is clear they don’t know the region they are attempting to represent. And yet, we suffer the consequences of such shallow and misguided representation.”

So remember: always get your translations double-checked. Translators get paid little enough as it is, so if you double the amount of work available for them, maybe they'll all be a bit better off. As will your TV shows.


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Review: Code Black 1x1 (US: CBS; UK: Watch)

Posted on October 1, 2015 | Post a comment | Bookmark and Share

Code Black

In the US: Wednesdays, 10/9c, CBS
In the UK: Thursdays, 9pm, Watch. Starts October 29 

CBS is, of course, the king of the police procedural in the US. Police procedurals of all ilks dominate its schedules and the ratings, and arguably it does them better than any other network.

However, for years, it's tried to extend its procedural dominance into the medical realm, with a seemingly neverending stream of shows that quickly turn out to be low-rated, instantly forgettable one-season wonders: Three Rivers, 3 Lbs, Miami Trauma, A Gifted Man.

In fact, I've written pretty much this exact same intro to every new medical procedural CBS has come up with every year, so much so I'm bored of it. Maybe you are, too.

Trouble is, I fully expect I'll be writing it again next year since CBS's latest medical procedural, Code Black, is a yawnfest that's almost certainly going to get cancelled by the end of the season. It's based on Code Black, a 2013 documentary about LA County General, which is one of the largest and busiest teaching hospitals in the US, employing more than 1,000 residents at a time. The name 'code black' refers to when an emergency department's resources are so overstretched by an influx of patients, it can't take it any more, and while most EDs in the US only experience four such events a year, LA County General experiences it 300 times a year.

Time for more resources, obviously. Except that wouldn't make for a great TV show.

And neither would Code Black, in which a whole bunch of competitive, disparate, highly dull medical residents all learn how to be ED doctors at the hands of 'dad', aka Marcia Gay Harden (The Newsroom, Damages), 'mom' being Luis Guzmán (Narcos), the senior nurse who looks after them all. Harden's a bit hard and lacking in bedside manner following 'an incident' three years previously, something that concerns caring, sharing fellow doctor Raza Jaffrey (ElementaryHomeland, Spooks) but not so much hospital administrator Kevin Dunn (Samantha Who?), since Harden's abrasive training produces the best doctors.

And that's it, really. It's basically ER but busier, not taking the time to do more in terms of characterisation rather than have people explain who they are and how totes awesome they are, before performing perfunctory acts of dickery. It's just blood on the floor to blood on the floor, while a camera unsuccessfully rushes around to try to convey the impression of the original Code Black documentary. Nice, if you like medical porn, dull if you want an actual drama.

The trouble is if you just rush all the time in an attempt to convey pressure, you're not going to end up with tension. You're going to end up with confusion. And then boredom.

The camera goes here, the camera goes there, while the cast mumble their lines or shout them so that you never hear them. All you'll really know most of the time is that people are ill and the doctors are trying to help them. Learn much about the US medical system from it all? Grow to love a character? Probably not.

There are scenes, almost all of them involving Dunn, where the show is allowed to breath and for characters to grow. But they're few and far between, and sometimes oddly positioned, such as when Dunn starts talking about his eczema in the middle of surgery, to emphasise the point that people are spending too much time on characterisation and need to get back to some advanced doctoring.

But, ultimately, Code Black is just procedure with very little human interest. See you back here next year with the intro?

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