Archive | Nostalgia corner

Classic shows that have almost been forgotten, as well as shows that should probably have been forgotten

October 6, 2015

What TV's on at the BFI in October/November? Including Diana Rigg and The Avengers

Posted on October 6, 2015 | Post a comment | Bookmark and Share

Around August, things get a bit weird with the BFI's scheduling and it starts putting out brochures for a month and a half at a time. As I was away on holiday in August, I missed out on September/October, but now we have October/November, which gives us a fair few events from the tail end of October together with a copious number from November.

The highlight of the list is an afternoon with Dame Diana Rigg to celebrate 50 years of Emma Peel and air a couple of episodes of The Avengers, including the superb The House That Jack Built. However, there's also a preview of ITV's Jekyll and Hyde, talks on romance and race and disability on TV, Celia Johnson and Trevor Howard's reunion in Staying On, showings of all seven episodes of Bouquet of Barbed Wire, and a season on the evolution of the TV documentary. 

All that and more after the jump. But first, do yourself a favour and if you haven't watched it already, watch The House That Jack Built. It's aces.

Continue reading "What TV's on at the BFI in October/November? Including Diana Rigg and The Avengers"

October 1, 2015

60s-style Thunderbirds is back thanks to Thunderbirds 1965

Posted on October 1, 2015 | Post a comment | Bookmark and Share

Thunderbirds, as most of you will know, was a 1960s Gerry Anderson series that used 'Supermarionation' puppets to enact stories in which a family of brothers go to the rescue of people around the world in a series of advanced rocket-ships called Thunderbirds. Just in case this doesn't ring a bell (you do own a TV, right?), here's the lovingly restored, HD-quality title sequence to give you a rough idea of what it was like:

The show made a resurgence in the 80s and it was remade this year by ITV but using CGI. I thought it good for what it was, but it lacked a certain charm compared to the puppet version. 

Apparently, other people agree. A recent Kickstarter project has taken three audio-only Thunderbirds adventure recorded in the 1960s by the original cast, and is using Supermarionation to create what are effectively three new episodes of the 1960s series. And here's the title sequence and a clip from the first one, The Abominable Snowman:

Pretty authentic, huh?


July 21, 2015

Kneale Before Nigel: Quatermass/The Quatermass Conclusion (1979)

Posted on July 21, 2015 | Post a comment | Bookmark and Share

The Quatermass Conclusion

QuatermassStarring: John Mills, Simon MacCorkindale, Barbara Kellerman
Writer: Nigel Kneale
Director: Piers Haggard
Price: Blu-ray £29.99 (Amazon price: £21.75), DVD £19.99 (Amazon price: £14.75)
Released: 27 July 2015

In the last quarter of the 20th century, the whole world seemed to sicken. Civilised institutions, whether old or new, fell… as if some primal disorder was reasserting itself. And men asked themselves, "Why should this be?"

Professor Bernard Quatermass is one of the most important characters in TV history. Created by blog god Nigel Kneale back in 1953 for the BBC, Quatermass was the hero of The Quatermass Experiment, a ground-breaking piece of adult science-fiction television, created at a time when all the US had to offer the world was Captain Video.

The Quatermass Experiment saw Quatermass, the head of the 'British Rocket Group’, sending into space a rocket containing three astronauts, only for it to come back down again with two of them missing and the survivor strangely changed. What happened to the missing astronauts is for the coldly scientific Quatermass to find out and his investigations are set to change the way we think about ourselves.

The six-part serial was so popular that despite being broadcast at a time when very few people actually owned a TV, it was able to empty the streets. The result was not only a movie adaptation by Hammer Films, but a 1955 sequel appropriately called Quatermass II. If The Quatermass Experiment was “we go to them”, Quatermass II was “they come to us”, with Quatermass discovering that his plans for a base on the moon have already been put into practice… in England. But what’s inside these domes and how is it that no one’s noticed them until now?

The popularity of this new serial was again sufficient for both a movie adaptation and another lavish sequel, Quatermass and the Pit, to be approved, the latter being broadcast in 1958. This saw a WWII bomb discovered during building works in London. However, subsequent examination reveals that the discovery is a lot, lot older than anyone could have guessed.

“We go to them”, “They come to us” but now it turns out that they have always been here - and that we are the Martians.

However, that was the last of Quatermass for a while. Although Kneale was asked in 1965 to write a new Quatermass story for the BBC2 anthology series Out of the Unknown, he declined the offer, which meant that the first new Quatermass the 1960s got to see was a Hammer adaptation of Quatermass and the Pit in 1967.

The success of this movie prompted Hammer to ask Kneale to write a new Quatermass movie for them, but that got no further than initial negotiations, meaning Quatermass and the Pit was also the only new Quatermass story of the 1960s. But following the success of The Stone Tape in 1972, the BBC asked Kneale for a new Quatermass serial… and he agreed.

Kneale completed the script in February 1973, after which preliminary filming work began. However, for various reasons, the BBC got cold feet, and the serial was cancelled in the summer of that year.

The BBC's rights to the serial expired in 1975, by which time Kneale was working for ITV on projects such as Murrain and Beasts. Then, in 1977, Star Wars arrived on the scene and suddenly everyone was interested in science-fiction again. In particular, Euston Films, an ITV film subsidiary, became interested - perhaps, in part, because it was overseen by blog goddess and famous Doctor Who producer Verity Lambert. And Euston wanted both a four-part TV series and a movie.

Guess what’s going to be released on Blu-Ray next week. Yes, after the jump, we’re going to be looking at the forthcoming release of Quatermass and The Quatermass Conclusion - the final adventures of Professor Bernard Quatermass (almost)

Here’s a trailer or three.

Continue reading "Kneale Before Nigel: Quatermass/The Quatermass Conclusion (1979)"

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