What TV’s on at the BFI in July 2017? Including Gross Indecency and Missing Believed Wiped: Pop TV

Two main strands of programming at the BFI in July: a season of programming about representations of gay representations on TV before and after the 1967 Sexual Offences Act and this year’s Missing Believed Wiped, featuring a whole bunch of programmes about pop music!

But there are a few other things, including a session dedicated to the fabulous Delia Derbyshire. All the details after the jump.

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What TV’s on at the BFI in June 2017? Including Penda’s Fen and Architecture on TV

The BFI has something of a rum concoction for its June 2017 programme. The main season is dedicated to architecture on TV, with a whole host of documentaries from the archives, as well as a Q&A with the rather marvellous Jonathan Meades.

But the other entry in the calendar is an entire Saturday dedicated to former TMINE Wednesday Play, Penda’s Fen. There’s a showing of the play in the evening, but the rest of the day is dedicated to a Penda’s Fen symposium, ‘Child Be Strange’, that will include a Q&A with the writer David Rudkin. Slightly odd order that, so you might want to watch the DVD a couple of times first.

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Totally Serialized: Le Repenti (Reborn) and Annette Andre – Randall and Hopkirk and Me

Bruno Debrandt

A couple of intriguing events for TV lovers have popped up on my radar recently.

Long-time readers will remember that for five years, the Institut Français organised an annual French/UK TV festival called ‘Totally Serialized‘. Some of you might even have won tickets to it on this ‘ere blog. However, there wasn’t one this year, since Totally Serialized is going to become a series of ongoing events throughout the year. 

The first of these is a showing on 26 April at 6.30pm at Ciné Lumière in London of France 2’s Le Repenti (Reborn), which is being made available on Walter Presents (US readers can get it through Amazon). It stars Engrenages (Spiral)’s Bruno Debrandt as Alexis, who six years after he was left for dead, burned and wounded by his best friend Victor whom he betrayed, returns to Le Havre to work undercover at Victor’s docks. After significant reconstructive surgery and a changed identity, he is unrecognizable but struggles to stay away from his ex-family.

As you do.

Debrandt will be there on stage in conversation with Walter himself, preceding the showing of episode one. It’s worth noting that it’s actually a two-part telemovie, originally broadcast in 2010, so you’ll only be getting half the story and given that episode one is 90 minutes long and the event’s supposed to finish at 8.15pm, that sounds like about 15 minutes of chat.

Unembeddable trailer is at the Walter Presents web site. Bookings here, with tickets £12 for adults.

Annette AndreElsewhere, for fans of old UK TV, on 22 April at 7pm at the Museum of Comedy, also in London, Annette Andre will be reminiscing about her career, particularly Randall and Hopkirk (Deceased), but also A Funny Thing Happened On The Way To The Forum and The Benny Hill Show. There’ll also be a chance to meet her afterwards. Tickets are £17 each.

What TV’s on at the BFI in May 2017? Including Fassbinder: Television Pioneer and the Trevor Griffiths season

Do you like playwright Trevor Griffiths? Do you like German TV? Then the BFI has a season and a single TV show for you in May.

‘Fassbinder: Television Pioneer’ looks at the German film director’s TV work, while ‘Interventions: The Television Plays of Trevor Griffiths’ covers the likes of Food For Ravens, All Good Men, Oi For England, Through the Night and Country, as well as an episode of Fall of Eagles. Details after the jump.

But first, here’s that Fall of Eagles ep, which looks at the origins of the Bolshevik/Menshevik split, as well as this week’s ‘Wednesday Play (on a Friday)’, All Good Men, in which a Marxist son confronts his moderate Labour father when he accepts a peerage – Dennis Potter described it as having ‘some of the sharpest, most telling and intelligent speeches ever heard on television’.

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Coursera is running a course on Scandinavian film and television

Coursera's Scandinavian TV and Film course

Watching all that peak TV yet still have a few hours left over each week? Then why not sign up for Coursera’s course on Scandinavian film and television? Run by the University of Copenhagen, it starts today and runs for five weeks, taking in everything from the Scandinavian welfare state through Ingmar Bergman and Lars von Trier to Nordic Noir.

I’m not sure it’ll help you get a job or anything, but you can even pay to get a certificate for completing it at the end. But watch a few videos, read a bit of background material and complete a few quizzes each week on your computer, phone or tablet, and you’ll at least know a lot more (probably) than you did before you started. And that won’t cost you a penny.

Ib Bondebjerg

Week One

Full details of the BFI & Radio Times Television Festival

The Crown at the BFI and Radio Times Television Festival

Although March might be a bit of a wash-out for tele at the BFI, April is looking a whole lot more promising thanks to the BFI & Radio Times Television Festival. I’ve already given you the highlights, but the BFI has now provided the rundown for the whole thing, including some shiny new events, special guests and even some archive French TV featuring Tom Baker. Being lazy, I’ve copied and pasted the whole shebang below.

New special guests* announced today include: Dame Maggie Smith (DOWNTON ABBEY), Aidan Turner (POLDARK), Claire Foy (THE CROWN), Stephen Daldry (THE CROWN), Sir Ridley Scott (TABOO), Charlie Brooker (BLACK MIRROR), Rowan Atkinson (MAIGRET), Jenna Coleman (VICTORIA), Susanne Bier (THE NIGHT MANAGER), Joe Wicks (THE BODY COACH), Jasmine and Melissa Hemsley (HEMSLEY + HEMSLEY), Tom Kerridge (TOM KERRIDGE’S PROPER PUB FOOD), Jack Thorne (NATIONAL TREASURE), Jed Mercurio (LINE OF DUTY), Lee Mack (NOT GOING OUT), Barry Cryer (I’M SORRY I HAVEN’T A CLUE), Adam Hills (THE LAST LEG/PARALYMPICS), Simon Nye (THE DURRELLS)

Guests join those names already announced: Michael Palin (MONTY PYTHON), Steven Moffat (DOCTOR WHO, SHERLOCK), Mark Gatiss (SHERLOCK), Julie Walters (NATIONAL TREASURE/DINNER LADIES), Keeley Hawes (THE DURRELLS), Josh O’Connor (THE DURRELLS), Simon Nye (THE DURRELLS), Freida Pinto (GUERRILLA), Babou Ceesay (GUERRILLA), Walter Iuzzolino (WALTER PRESENTS), Jacqueline Wilson (TRACY BEAKER), Judith Kerr (THE TIGER WHO CAME TO TEA), Michael Morpurgo (WAR HORSE) and Helen and Rob from The Archers

The BFI and Radio Times today announce the full line-up for the BFI & Radio Times Television Festival, celebrating the current golden age of TV with more than 40 events featuring some of the biggest names on the small screen. The new events announced today include the stars, writers and producers of some of the biggest TV shows of the year; including The Crown, Victoria, The Night Manager, Line of Duty, Poldark, Sherlock, Black Mirror and Strictly Come Dancing. Joining the line-up of TV stars is acclaimed director Sir Ridley Scott, who will be in conversation following a screening on Saturday 8 April of The Author of Beltraffio (TF1 1974), a precious gem which has recently been rediscovered by the BFI National Archive, and was directed by Sir Ridley’s brother, the late Tony Scott. This TV drama has been unseen since its UK transmission in 1976 and stars Doctor Who’s fourth Time Lord Tom Baker.

Other highlights announced today include:

IN CONVERSATION:

  • Dame Maggie Smith will make a rare appearance onstage on Saturday 8 April; the legendary Downton Abbey actor will reflect on her life on stage and screen.
  • The satirical writer and broadcaster Charlie Brooker will talk about his work including Screenwipe, Dead Set and the award-winning Black Mirror as well as his TV influences on Sunday 9 April.
  • Comedians Lee Mack and Barry Cryer have spent many years writing sketches and sitcoms for television; join these two giants of comedy on Sunday 9 April as they discuss their craft and comedies past, present and future.

PANEL DISCUSSIONS:

  • Opening the Festival on Friday 7 April will be an event dedicated to Maigret starring Rowan Atkinson. Atkinson will be joined by exec producer John Simenon, son of original Maigret creator Georges Simenon, to talk about bringing the enigmatic sleuth to the small screen.
  • A panel discussion about Netflix’s lavish drama The Crown with executive producer Stephen Daldry, Claire Foy, who plays the Queen, and more cast and crew TBA will take place on Saturday 8 April. The discussion will offer audiences an insight into the making of this majestic drama which recently won Golden Globes for actor Claire Foy and for Best Drama.
  • On Saturday 8 April Victoria stars Jenna Coleman and Tom Hughes will take a break from filming the second series, along with writer-creator Daisy Goodwin and executive producer Damien Timmer, to discuss ITV’s Sunday night hit drama.
  • The compelling adaptation of John le Carré’s book The Night Manager became one of the TV highlights of 2016; on Sunday 9 April Oscar-winning director Susanne Bier, executive producers Simon Cornwell and Stephen Garrett, and cast member Alistair Petrie will explain how they created such brilliant water-cooler TV that kept us on the edge of our seats.
  • On Saturday 8 April there will be a special Poldark event, with the drama’s leading man Aidan Turner, writer Debbie Horsfield and executive producer Damien Timmer. Audiences will also get a glimpse of series three, due to be aired this autumn.
  • On Sunday 9 April join Doctor Who executive producer Brian Minchin, and cast members to talk about the joys and challenges of making the world’s longest-running sci-fi series. With a sneak preview of clips from the upcoming series, set to be the last full series for Moffat and for star Peter Capaldi.
  • Moffat’s other worldwide smash for the BBC is the marvellous re-imagining of Arthur Conan Doyle’s great detective Sherlock, co-written and co-created by Mark Gatiss and exec-produced by Moffat’s wife Sue Vertue. An event on Sunday 9 April will see a discussion of the compelling sound of Sherlock with Gatiss and Vertue along with composers David Arnold and Michael Price.
  • Join writer Jed Mercurio and members of the cast of Line of Duty on Saturday 8 April as they discuss the latest series of the compelling drama as it moves to BBC One and the dark word of AC12 and police corruption. 
  • Meet the unsung stars of Strictly Come Dancing on Saturday 8 April; executive producer Louise Rainbow, talent executive Vinnie Shergill, director of choreography Jason Gilkison and head of costume Vicky Gill are some of the team responsible for putting together the glitziest programme on TV.
  • On Sunday 9 April athletes Libby Clegg and Susie Rogers will be joined by comedian and Last Leg host Adam Hills to discuss how Channel 4’s exciting, dedicated coverage of The Paralympics has changed public attitudes towards those who are physically different.
  • Join the country’s best-loved wordsmith Susie Dent on Saturday 8 April as she vacates Countdown’s dictionary corner to take audiences on an entertaining and informative journey across the rolling landscape of the English language.

MASTERCLASSES:

  • How to Become a Social Media Star on Saturday 8 April with guests Joe Wicks (The Body Coach) and the Hemsley Sisters (Hemsley + Hemsley), will reveal how they turned themselves into lifestyle gurus, TV presenters, and social media stars.
  • BAFTA-winning writer Jack Thorne will give a masterclass on Sunday 9 April, speaking about his influences and work at the forefront of British TV’s current golden age including National Treasure, Skins, Shameless and The Fades and his forthcoming adaption of Philip Pullman’s His Dark Materials for the BBC.

TREASURES FROM THE BFI NATIONAL ARCHIVE:

  • Sir Ridley Scott will be in discussion following a screening of his brother Tony’s TV drama Author of Beltraffio (TF1, 1974) which has remained unseen since its UK transmission in 1976. This drama was the British contribution to a five-part series of Henry James stories made for French TV in 1974 and stars Tom Baker.
  • The Festival programmers have plundered the BFI National Archive to put together a collection of memorable moments from Tom Jones’ outstanding ATV series This Is Tom Jones (1969-1971); on Saturday 8 April audiences will be able to revel in clips of special stars such as Dusty Springfield and Stevie Wonder performing one-off duets with their host.
  • TV Dinners with Tom Kerridge on Saturday 8 April will celebrate larger-than-life cookery stars such as Fanny Cradock and even Vincent Price, bringing us up to date via Mary Berry and Delia Smith with clips drawn from the BFI National Archive and hosted by the Michelin-starred chef and TV cookery star Tom Kerridge.

FAMILY EVENTS:

  • On Sunday 9 April there will be a preview of two brand new episodes from CBBC’s top football drama Jamie Johnson. Hear from the writers, selected cast and crew, plus a special celebrity guest, after the screening.

EVENTS WITH RADIO TIMES EXPERTS:

  • Spoiler alert! How to Write About Television on Saturday 8 April will see Radio Times’ TV Editor Alison Graham, Deputy TV Editor David Butcher and RT’s Choices writers share a few secrets of the previewer’s art.
  • The Making of a Cover Star on Saturday 8 April sees Radio Times Art Director Shem Law and prolific Radio Times photographer Don Smith discuss 90 years of iconic covers and what it takes to create them.

What TV’s on at the BFI in March 2017? Including Reporting History: Kate Adie in Conversation

March looks like it’s going to be a quiet month at the BFI for TV lovers. In fact, there’s precisely one event happening and that’s a chat with Kate Adie about her career. Still, Kate Adie’s cool so that’s pretty good.

Monday 6 March
18:15 NFT1
Reporting History: Kate Adie in Conversation 
TRT 90min

Kate Adie is one of the UK’s most trusted and respected journalists. Her incisive and informative reporting from the front line has bought contemporary history into the living rooms of millions of viewers and provided us all with a global perspective on major events. As the BBC’s Chief News Correspondent her assignments have included: the final NATO intervention in Kosovo; the Herald of Free Enterprise disaster; the massacre at Dunblane; the SAS lifting of the Iran Embassy Siege in London; and the Tiananmen Square protest in Beijing in 1989. Join Adie as she discusses her amazing career alongside fascinating clips, followed by a chance for you to ask your own questions. 
Tickets £16, concs £12 (Members pay £1.70 less)

Champions’ priority booking: February 6 11.30am
Members’ priority booking opens: February 7 11.30am
Public booking opens: February 14 11.30am

Prices
Members: £10.10
Member concs: £7.55
Non-members: £11.75
Non-member concs: £9.20
Under 16s £6.00

Reduced prices for weekday matinees. Conc prices are available to senior citizens, students, unwaged and disability visitors. Proof of eligibility may be required.
As always, visit the BFI web site for more details.

What TV’s on at the BFI in February 2017? Including Loyalties, The Day of Ragnarok and The Nearly Man

Here we are, January barely even begun, yet we’re now looking at what the BFI is planning on showing in February. Phew. Hold on tight – 2017’s going to be speedy, everyone.

February’s TV season will probably seem to go by quickly, too, since it’s exclusively dedicated to ‘Forgotten Dramas’ – a range of little-known TV dramas. Basically, ones people have forgotten about but deserve to be known better, such as Rudolph Cartier’s last directorial project Loyalties, John McGrath’s experimental The Day of Ragnarok and Arthur Hopcraft’s gritty political piece The Nearly Man, which inspired a subsequent TV series.

It’s curated by Lez Cooke, John Hill and Billy Smart as part of Royal Holloway’s project The History of Forgotten Television Drama in the UK, so an extra bonus is a TV conference on Wednesday 22nd February all about TV archives, access and research.

All that and more after the jump. No videos, I’m afraid, because, you know, they’re forgotten dramas. If there were videos, they probably wouldn’t be forgotten.

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The Radio Times festival has moved to the South Bank

Radio Times TV festival 2017

Last year saw the hosting of the first Radio Times festival. As I pointed out when I went, it was a slightly odd affair hosted in a park opposite Hampton Court, with plenty of illustrious speakers, book signings, pop-up food shops and regular old book shops. 

Maybe it’s oddness, the strange location and the difficulty booking tickets, particularly on the day, that meant that there wasn’t one this year, as the Radio Times events team had a rethink. But next year, it’s back on 7-9 April, this time in association with the BFI, who had a bit of a presence at the first event but wasn’t the co-organiser. 

Unsurprisingly, it’s therefore being held at the BFI Southbank and there aren’t quite as many things to see, given there are only three theatres. But the preliminary programme is out now, there’s plenty to watch – not just from the UK but from overseas thanks to Walter – a few authors and a bit about the radio, too. You can buy tickets today if you’re a BFI patron or champion, tomorrow if you’re a BFI member and Monday if you’ve not already given the BFI a big lump of cash this year. 

Friday
Radio Times Hall of Fame: Michael Palin

Join us as comedian, actor, writer and globetrotter Michael Palin takes us on a journey through his amazing life.

East of Ipswich
Palin’s acclaimed, bittersweet ‘near autobiographical’ drama about a teenager’s first sexual experiences on a seaside family holiday.

Saturday
TV Premiere: The Durrells
Screening of the first episode of the new series, followed by an on-stage chat with members of the cast and crew.

Call the Midwife
Join series creator Heidi Thomas as she shares the secrets of the show alongside executive producer Pippa Harris and cast members.

Victoria Wood: A Tribute
Julie Walters and colleagues come together to share their memories of the late, great Victoria Wood and introduce some memorable clips.

Victoria Wood: Two Creatures Great and Small + Victoria Wood at the Albert Hall
Two gems from Wood’s career that capture all her brilliance as an award-winning stand-up performer

Sunday
Hetty Feather + Meet Jacqueline WilsonWatch two new episodes of the enchanting CBBC children’s drama, and meet author Jacqueline Wilson, creator of Hetty Feather and ex-children’s laureate, and selected cast and crew.

The Archers: The Trial of Helen Titchener
Louiza Patikas (Helen), Tim Watson (Rob) and former Archers editor Sean O’Connor reveal the inside story of Rob and Helen.

Judith Kerr and Michael Morpurgo
Two of our best-loved children’s authors, Judith Kerr (The Tiger Who Came To Tea) and Michael Morpurgo (War Horse) in conversation.

Mark Gatiss: From League of Gentlemen to Sherlock
Writer/actor/comedian and fantasy maestro Mark Gatiss talks to Radio Times Television editor Alison Graham about his favourite TV moments, including Sherlock.

Walter presents: TV Premiere: Merciless + Meet Walter
Following this bold Brazilian drama meet Walter Iuzzolino, curator of Walter Presents, the service introducing international TV dramas to the UK.

Walter presents: TV Premiere: Locked Up
Season 2 opener of the Spanish prison drama + interview with actor Berta Vázquez, co-creator Iván Escobar and Walter Iuzzolino.

Radio Times Hall of Fame: Steven Moffat
Steven Moffat – showrunner of two of the UK’s biggest TV shows, Doctor Who and Sherlock – in conversation with Frank Skinner.

TV Premiere: Guerrilla (Sky Atlantic)
Exclusive preview of a Sky Original 1970s set thriller about a group of black power activists in London + cast and crew on-stage.

What TV’s on at the BFI in January 2017? Including Sherlock, Abigail’s Party and Nuts in May

Gosh, 2017 came round quickly, didn’t it? Yes, already, we’re looking at what the BFI is showing in January next year. Two big things:

  1. A tiny, tiny Sherlock season. Only one episode in fact. But it’s a new one. Maybe some of the cast might even be attending
  2. An Aliston Steadman season. Quite a big one, since includes the likes of Abigail’s Party, Nuts in May, Pasmore, Girl and Virtuoso, as well as Alan Bleasdale’s first TV drama, Early To Bed.

Details after the jump, although you might want to listen to a bit of Demis Roussos first.

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