Archive | Featured articles

Some of the best articles on the blog. Typically, these have a picture. It's a low entrance requirement, I know.


April 25, 2013

Nostalgia corner: Remington Steele (1982-1987)

Posted on April 25, 2013 | Post a comment | Bookmark and Share

Remington Steele

"Try this for a deep, dark secret. The great detective Remington Steele, he doesn't exist... I invented him. Follow: I always loved excitement so I studied and apprenticed and put my name on an office but absolutely nobody knocked down my door. A female private investigator seemed so… feminine, so I invented a superior, a decidedly masculine superior. Suddenly there were cases around the block. It was working like a charm until the day he walked in with his blue eyes and mysterious past and before I knew it he assumed Remington Steele's identity. Now I do the work and he takes the bows. It's a dangerous way to live but as long as people buy it I can get the job done. We never mix business with pleasure, well, almost never. I don't even know his real name."

It's hard for women to get to the top in business. Don't believe me? Just check how many women are CEOs or members of the boards of directors for Fortune 500 companies.

The reasons for this are long and complicated, involving history, discrimination and a whole lot more. In particular, there's perception. Some people, both men and women, don't think women are going to be as good as men are at certain jobs.

Particularly private detectives. Or at least people didn't in 1982, before VI Warshawski, Anna Lee and co. Certainly, Laura Holt (Stephanie Zimbalst) found it hard to get any work when she started out. She may have come top of her class at pretty much everything, but with her name on the door, for some strange reason, no one was interested in hiring her.

So crafty Laura Holt decided to invented a boss with a very masculine name: Remington Steele (Remington as in gun, rather than Fuzzaway). Suddenly, for some equally strange reason, people were queuing up to hire her - well, they wanted Remington Steele, but he was always out of town on business but somehow he always managed to solve his cases with the help of his 'assistant'.

All was going well with this set-up until a movie-loving, very handsome con man (Pierce Brosnan) turned up and assumed Steele's identity. Together, he and Holt end up working together, solving crimes. But would their relationship ever become more, when it was all founded in lies - hell, she didn't even know his real name? Well… that would be saying.

Here's the intro from the very first episode - the observant will notice the wording is different. After that, the full, rather catchy, Henry Mancini-scored theme tune, and then every episode title from the show, all of which were puns.

Continue reading "Nostalgia corner: Remington Steele (1982-1987)"

April 22, 2013

Review: Doctor Who - 7x10 - Hide

Posted on April 22, 2013 | Post a comment | Bookmark and Share

DoctorWhoHide.jpg

In the UK: Saturday, 6.15pm, 20th April 2013, BBC1/BBC1 HD. Available on the iPlayer
In the US: Saturday, 8pm/7c, 20th April 2013, BBC America

Nigel Kneale is something of a god on this blog. A revolutionary writer of some of the best scripts in British TV history, his effect can still be felt today. One of his most powerful and influential works was The Stone Tape, a genuinely scary scientific ghost story that has leant its name to a parapsychology concept: the idea that ghosts may be 'memories' of events somehow imprinted on buildings or the landscape. When you have a mo, watch it below…

The latest piece of British TV to owe a debt to The Stone Tape was Saturday's episode of Doctor Who - Hide, which not only had a scientist investigating a haunted house with the help of scientific apparatus and a woman with psychic abilities, it was even set in the 70s.

Now, I have to admit I wasn't sure what to expect of this. On the one hand, it was written by Neil Cross, who also wrote the rather dreadful Rings of Akhaten. On the other, Cross only got the job of writing Rings, because he'd apparently impressed Steven Moffat and co with the quality of this script. Cross also has ghost-story form, having written the recent BBC2 adaptation of MR James's Whistle and I'll Come To You.

So which Cross were we going to get, I was wondering: super-scary ghost-writing Cross or sucky singing child Cross?

Thankfully, it turned out to be the former. Here's a trailer.

Continue reading "Review: Doctor Who - 7x10 - Hide"

Read other posts about:

April 18, 2013

Review: Da Vinci's Demons 1x1 (Starz/FOX)

Posted on April 18, 2013 | Post a comment | Bookmark and Share

Da Vinci's Demons

In the US: Fridays, 9pm, Starz
In the UK: Fridays, 10pm, Fox. Starts 19th April

You might have thought the horror that was Torchwood: Miracle Day had ended. There's no more Torchwood, thanks to the series being so poorly received, even the majority of die-hard Torchwood fans couldn't bear any more episodes. Yet like that giant hole in the middle of the Earth, sucking the joy from life in that show's finale, so its legacy carries on.

That legacy is an alliance between BBC Worldwide and Starz aimed at creating yet more dramas as good as Torchwood: Miracle Day - yes, that good - and Da Vinci's Demons is its first bastard offspring. On paper, it might have seemed a good idea, with David Goyer, the co-writer of Batman Begins, crafting a historical fantasy series about the early life of Leonardo Da Vinci. The well known Renaissance polymath, he's popped up in enough shows over the years that he probably deserved a show of his own.

But in practice, it's not. Starz has tried to do historical shows before. It's had huge, deserved success with Spartacus; Magic City may just be nasty but it's a loving recreation of the 1950s Miami at the very least. Unfortunately, rather than aping either of those two shows, it's decided to go the Camelot route and produced a genre-busting show that marries Camelot's sex, nudity, poor action and complete bypass of virtually all history; the BBC's child-friendly but atrocious Merlin, Robin Hood and Bonekickers; the setting and political intrigue of The Borgias; the ridiculous conspiracy theories of The Da Vinci Code; and elements of movies ranging from Batman Begins to Hudson Hawk. Yes, the probably gay Florentine polymath Leonardo Da Vinci is actually a leather-jacket wearing shagger of women, prone to the occasional sword-fight with the local guards, who somehow gets mixed up with the magical secret society that is the Sons of Mithras, all while flying people around in his inventions.

And it's all filmed in Wales with an almost entirely British cast. Be proud. We made this.

Continue reading "Review: Da Vinci's Demons 1x1 (Starz/FOX)"

  1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 100 101 102 103 104 105 106 107 108 109 110 111 112 113 114 115 116 117 118 119 120 121 122 123 124 125 126 127 128 129 130 131 132 133 134 135 136 137 138 139 140 141 142 143 144 145 146 147 148 149 150 151 152 153 154 155 156 157 158 159 160 161 162 163 164 165 166 167 168 169 170 171 172 173 174 175 176 177 178 179 180 181 182 183 184 185 186 187 188 189 190 191 192 193 194 195 196 197 198 199 200 201 202 203 204 205 206 207 208 209 210 211 212 213 214 215 216 217 218 219 220 221 222 223 224 225 226 227 228 229 230 231 232 233 234 235 236 237 238 239 240 241 242 243 244 245 246 247 248 249 250 251 252 253 254 255 256 257 258 259 260 261 262 263 264 265 266 267 268 269 270 271 272 273 274 275 276 277 278 279 280 281 282 283 284 285 286 287 288 289 290 291 292 293 294 295 296 297 298 299 300 301 302 303 304 305 306 307 308 309 310 311 312 313 314 315 316 317 318 319 320 321 322 323 324 325 326 327 328 329 330 331 332 333 334 335 336 337 338 339 340 341 342 343 344 345 346 347 348 349 350 351 352 353 354 355 356 357 358 359 360 361 362 363 364 365 366 367 368 369 370 371 372 373 374 375 376 377 378 379 380 381 382 383 384 385 386 387 388 389 390 391 392 393 394 395 396 397 398  

Featured Articles

Famous In Love

A slap in the face to aspiring actresses