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The Wednesday Play: Vampires (1979)

Posted on June 17, 2015 | Post a comment | Bookmark and Share

Sir Christopher Lee in Vampires

Given the sad passing of Sir Christopher Lee this week, it seems appropriate that this week's The Wednesday Play should be Vampires, a 1979 BBC Play For Today, about the power of horror movies to affect the imagination. One of the slot's best remembered plays, it nevertheless features mainly untrained, child actors and was written by an unknown, Liverpool writer Dixie Williams. 

One of only two film productions BBC Pebble Mill could afford to make that year, Vampires tells the story of three boys who stay up late to watch Lee's career-launching role - Hammer classic Dracula: Prince of Darkness. Suitably entranced, they soon end up playing at being vampires, but down the local cemetery, they become convinced that a lone man dressed in black is a real-life vampire. As the play progresses, increasingly spookier and macabre events transpire and the play continues to suggest that maybe they're not wrong and that vampires are the least of their worries…

Directed by John Goldschmidt, who was best known for his documentaries at the time and who gives the play a distinctly matter-of-fact approach to its supernatural subject, Vampires also includes moments of great fun, including a schoolboy discussion of the difference between horror and science-fiction that invokes The Quatermass Experiment, as well as more traditional Play For Today themes, including the difficulty of bringing up kids when you're a poor, working class mother living in Liverpool in the late 70s.

And it's your Wednesday Play. Enjoy!

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