February 24, 2017

Review: The Good Fight 1x1 (US: CBS All Access)

Posted yesterday at 14:55 | Post a comment | Bookmark and Share

The Good Fight

In the US: Sundays, CBS All Access

Spin-offs are a tricky business. You want to try to attract as many people to watch them as possible. Yet if you make the spin-off too different, maybe the fans of the original show won't like it and won't watch; meanwhile, those who didn't watch the original won't watch because they know it's a spin-off. But if you make the spin-off too similar, the fans might get bored of seeing more of the same, while everyone else won't watch for exactly the same reasons they didn't watch the original.

The Good Wife was an ultimately much raved about drama in which Julianna Margulies returned to work as a lawyer after her cheating husband got locked up. I quite enjoyed it but I ended up watching only a few episodes, since it wasn't so good I wanted to stick it out beyond episode three, so I never really got to learn why everyone ended up loving it so much in later episodes.

Now we have The Good Fight, a spin-off from The Good Wife that's also the first show put out exclusively on CBS's new online-only Hulu rival, CBS All Access. And it all seems a bit familiar, even to me.

For starters, it sees Christine Baranski reprise her role as one of Margulies' mentors at her law firm, from which she's just about to retire. However, before you can say "well, how are they going to have a legal show if she's retired?", her accountant (CSI's Paul Guilfoyle) is revealed to have possibly been the architect of a Ponzi Scheme and all her money is now either missing or tied up in the investigation. Retirement? Not for you.

Trouble is, her old firm wants her gone and her association with Guilfoyle means none of her clients want to go with her if she leaves. Fortunately, there's another law firm for which Delroy Lindo and Good Wife regular Cush Jumbo work that might be interested in hiring her, so she can do good works, instead of defending the indefensible. Will she join the good guys and fight The Good Fight?

Well, duh.

Coming with her is Rose Leslie (the red-headed wildling from Game of Thrones), Guilfoyle's newly graduated lawyer daughter and former golden girl, who's now as toxic as Baranski, so it's basically The Good Wife again, in which an older female lawyer partnered by a younger (gay) woman rediscovers her worth and ambitions through a new job. There are what felt like a lot of references to that show and a certain degree of foreknowledge required of the viewers, such as the opening scene of Baranski watching the Trump inauguration silently devastated which is never referred to again, but I'm assuming is a reference to her political sensibilities. But it wasn't so debilitating that I couldn't understand or enjoy what was going on.

To be honest, while it's not hugely different from any number of other legal dramas, The Good Fight is at least well written, has a good cast and is occasionally funny. Possessed of no fewer than three Brits in its line-up pretending to be American (Lindo, Leslie and Jumbo), it's happy to mock that fact for the audience's pleasure by getting Delroy to ask Jumbo to answer phones in a London accent. Lockhart's loss of her retirement plans is a source of pathos, as is the fact the show also frequently has much poorer people who suffered from the Ponzi scheme explaining they've worked for 20 years and got nothing to show for it, too. TMZ investigations of Leslie and her girlfriend also enable Jumbo to offer friendship in a time of need by offering advice from Margulies' experiences, and Lockhart's relationship with her possibly soon to be ex-husband (Gary Cole) is actually quite touching.

But The Good Fight is nothing that new as a legal drama, even less so for anyone who's watched The Good Wife. Maybe that's why it's on CBS All Access - it would probably get cancelled quickly on broadcast TV but being quite cheap to make and on the Internet, it could find a niche quite easily. 

I'll probably give episode two a watch at least to see if takes the show in a different direction. Nevertheless, I suspect that just as with The Good Wife, I'll be out after three, even though there's nothing that wrong with it.

When's that show you mentioned starting again, TMINE? Including The New Edition Story

Posted yesterday at 13:16 | Post a comment | Bookmark and Share

Every Friday, I let you know the latest announcements about when new, imported TV shows will finally be arriving on UK screens - assuming anyone's bought anything, of course.

Not much new this week. In fact there's only one show and I've never even heard of it or its subject, and I didn't even know the UK network it's airing on existed. So there you go. Surprise!

The New Edition Story (US: BET; UK: BET International)
Thursday, March 2, 9pm
Reviews: Nope

 

News: Mount Pleasant, Six, Witless renewed; Lauren Graham curbs her enthusiasm; Dan Harmon: sitcom guest star; + more

Posted yesterday at 07:24 | Post a comment | Bookmark and Share

The poster for CHIPS

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February 23, 2017

Third-episode verdict: Legion (US: FX; UK: Fox UK)

Posted 2 days ago at 19:26 | Post a comment | Bookmark and Share

BarrometerLegion.jpgA Barrometer rating of 2

In the US: Wednesdays, 10pm ET/PT, FX
In the UK: Thursdays, 9pm, Fox UK

Legion, FX's new superhero show based on a Marvel X-Men comic of the same name, has one big problem: it's a superhero show based on a Marvel X-Men comic of the same name. Were it not for that singular problem, the show would be able to avoid some of the now colossally well worn tropes of that 'universe' and be able to plough its own wonderful furrow unfettered. Instead, despite its majestic wildness, psychedelic directorial vision, and focus on the psychological and just plain old insane, and despite also foregoing much of the original source material, Legion still has to have mutants at war with the government, exploring their abilities, feeling oppressed, yadda, yadda, yadda.

Other than that, though, Legion is really a joy to behold, although the degree of joy depends on how much show creator Noah Hawley (Fargo) is involved in it. Episode one, which was both written by and directed by Hawley, is absolutely amazing, a mind-bending, reality warping piece of 70s-style trippiness. Since then, Hawley has been less involved, only writing the second episode and neither writing nor directing the third, all of which has resulting in slightly diminished returns that rely considerably on what Hawley set up in the first episode, but without innovating too much themselves.

Nevertheless, while considerably less visually inventive - although all credit to whomever thought having a little boy with a Frank Sidebottom-style paper head would be scary - and not having as strong a sense of plotting as before, Legion has remained quality viewing, effectively becoming a mystery story of the mind, as we try to work out what's been going on in Dan Stevens' head - and everyone hopes that if they do find out, it won't cause him to accidentally destroy reality in some way with his amazing mental powers. Characterisation for everyone except Stevens is weak, with the show revolving almost exclusively around its titular character and his issues, and the show effectively only has two real locations, in which people mostly sit and chat a lot each week. But somehow it doesn't really seem to matter, since the show manages to remain almost constantly fascinating, never truly revealing what's real and what's imagination or distortion. It's also frequently quite frightening, as we deal with Stevens' various internal nightmares.

I do hope that the show manages to avoid the pitfalls being part of the X-Men universe brings. But even with its superheroic problems, it's still a great piece of weekly viewing.

News: Lethal Weapon, Star renewed; new Scottish TV channel; London Studios to close; + more

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Ghost in the Shell

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February 22, 2017

Third-episode verdict: Imposters (US: Bravo)

Posted 3 days ago at 21:07 | Post a comment | Bookmark and Share

BarrometerImposters.jpgA Barrometer rating of 2

In the US: Tuesdays, 10/9c, Bravo

So it turns out that despite being about con artists and their victims, Imposters is quite nice and quite funny. The basic story is that Inbar Levi (The Last Ship) is a conwoman who gets men - and women - to fall in love with them, marries them, steals all their money with the help of her accomplices (Katherine LaNasa, Brian Benben), and then moves on to her next mark. However, over the course of the first three episodes, a group of her jilted exes (Rob Heaps, Parker Young, Marianne Rendón) slowly discover the existence of one another and like a slightly sad and broken, slightly more incompetent, but considerably more likable Magnificent Seven, they head off in pursuit of Levi in the hope of getting their money back - and maybe even Levi herself.

The show oscillates between sadness and hilarity. Episode one, which gives us sensitive Heaps' sudden descent from bliss to despair, is suicidally miserable; episode two, on the other hand, gives us the knuckle-headed Young and the slow forging of a partnership between Young and Heaps; episode three adds Rendón and veers between melancholy and mischief, as we see how Young might have slightly greater depths and Rendón is a therapy-addicted hipster.

Imposters also has two converging but separate storylines, with Levi trying to trick her current mark, the rich, sweet but dull Aaron Douglas but thinking she might have a real relationship with the handsome Stephen Bishop instead. While Levi is having second thoughts about 'the life', Heaps, Young and Rendón are starting to learn the art of the con (some might already know a little about it) in order to boost their penniless existence. Eventually, they might all meet in the middle of a grey morality and be suitable for each other

Where Imposters is most interesting is its commentaries on relationships. Levi makes people fall in love with her, by giving them what they want - her marks all want to believe her. Meanwhile, when Levi genuinely wants to settle down, she can't because she can't stop acting and so setting off warning sirens with other people's intuition.

But the show's nebulous con organisation is also quite a fun invention, with episode three giving Benben a bit more to do (which is nice - you remember Dream On, don't you?)…

…as well as introducing Uma Thurman as the organisation's enforcer, who'll go full Kill Bill on Levi if she gets out of line.

Imposters is at its best when it's being slightly silly, but it's still no shirk when it comes to dealing with the rawer aspects of the emotions. The cast are good, Levi is impressive and while it doesn't exactly have the hard edge of a Noir, it does have a bit more of a proximity to reality than Leverage did. It's not really doing anything that new in terms of plotting, but it's an amusing exploration of ideas, characters and emotions nevertheless.

News: Walter acquires Pulsaciones (Lifeline); Big Field, The Mick renewed; Demi Moore to recur on Empire; + more

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The cast of the Han Solo solo prequel movie

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February 21, 2017

Review: Bellevue 1x1 (Canada: CBC)

Posted 4 days ago at 21:41 | Post a comment | Bookmark and Share

Bellevue

In Canada: Mondays, 9pm, CBC

They say one of the reasons that Denmark likes its horrific murder-mysteries on TV so much is that it's one of the nicest places in the world to live. With no emotional darkness in their lives, allegedly, the happy old Hygge-filled Danes have to live vicariously through Nordic Noir.

I'm assuming that's why lovely, happy Canada appears to be developing its own equivalent. We've already seen CTV's Cardinal firmly embracing the darkness to pioneer 'Canadian Noir' and now we have CBC plummeting into similar territory, although putting its own, very CBC spin on it. Here, we have Anna Paquin (The Piano, X-MenTrue Blood) playing a cop in the small town of Bellevue, investigating the disappearance of a trans teenage hockey star. Has he been beaten by homophobic fans or is something more sinister afoot?

Suspecting a known paedophile who's moved into town, she's surprised when her suspect is expecting her and even more surprised when he hands her a note that appears to be from her father. Or at least whoever it was who pretended to be her father after he died. Because when Paquin was just a kid, a teenage girl was killed and posed as the Virgin Mary in the nativity, outside the local church. Paquin's cop dad was in charge of finding the killer and when he failed, he committed suicide. Except a few years later, Paquin started receiving riddles addressed to her by her dad…

Bellevue is a bit of a botch job. One moment it's trying to be The Killing (and failing). The next it's trying to be The Exorcist III (and failing). The next it's trying to be Broadchurch (and failing). It's hard to know what mood the story will be in from moment to moment, and everything joins together as smoothly as if the writer had been given a bucket of fish and a crochet kit and been asked to turn them into a Ford Fiesta.

To its credit, its efforts to show small-town Canadian life make it a little bit different from other shows, but the dialogue is pretty cringe-worthy, especially anything involving new cop in town Sharon Taylor (Stargate Atlantis). It has a fine cast, too, particularly Paquin who's given a chance to show off her Oscar-winning range, but also Shawn Doyle (Endgame, Frequency, Vegas, This Life) as her boss and substitute father-figure. 

However, Bellevue has very little else to go for it, so if you are going to watch some of this new breed of Canadian Noir, Cardinal is a superior choice by far.

Third-episode verdict: APB (US: Fox)

Posted 4 days ago at 19:10 | Post a comment | Bookmark and Share

BarrometerAPB.jpgA Barrometer rating of 4

In the US: Mondays, 9/8c, Fox

There was never much chance that APB would ever be much good, but with Matt Nix (Burn Notice, Complications, The Good Guys) taking over as showrunner midway through the pilot, there was at least the possibility it might be. Fox's attempt to do for policing what Iron Man did for World Peace, it sees Justin Kirk adopt the Robert Downey Jr mantel to become a billionaire playboy philanthropist engineer who discovers crime is bad and decides to bring his private sector technological expertise to bear on a problematic police district in Chicago. Can smartphone apps, drones and GPS information - as well as $120m of investment - bring an end to crime, or will it turn out to be a bit more complicated than that?

The first episode was phenomenally stupid and derivative, but with the occasional bit of fun. Episode two gave us a mix of stupids: on the one hand, we had Kirk once again back at HQ trying to bring to book a road racer who is smart enough to work out that drones can't fly where there's no decent signal; on the other, we have cops going dewey eyed over kids who have been mowed down and police dogs who have been blown up ("No!"). But it wasn't quite as stupid, and there was an element of fun and excitement, with Kirk dicking around with motorbikes for most of an episode to give us his own version of Street Hawk, complete with street chases. We also had The Tall Guy from ER turn up, hugely probably, as a former pro-wrestler with an PhD in electronics, to give Kirk his own Jarvis to talk to when he's doing some remodelling.

Just for a glimmering moment, it seemed like the show understood how stupid it was and was going to have some fun instead, giving us a piece of programming that teenagers can watch, be excited by and decided to become engineers. Because this is a show trying to make engineers look sexy. Even Justin Kirk.

Sure, there was the daftness of having the vengeful mayor of Chicago putting the husband of Kirk's right-hand woman in charge of the anti-Kirk task squad, but soapiness we can ignore. However, episode three was simply moronic and soporific. While the first episode had Kirk giving us his solutions to existing problems and the show demonstrating how they'd work in practice, both episodes two and three flipped that formula: new problem turns up, Kirk devises a solution to it. And episode three's problem was the age-old issue of interrogation - how to get a criminal to tell you the truth? Now here, people have already seen the problem and come up with a technical solution: the lie detector. And we know its limitations, as well as the civil liberty implications. We know reality and its nuances.

But since the format demands that Kirk be a brilliant inventor, he has to come up with a costly technical solution, too. Here, he gives us… the lie detector chair! You sit in the chair and people know your vital signs and therefore whether you're lying! You don't even have to touch any electrodes or anything! Just as long as you're sitting in that chair, everything will be fine. It's nonsense, of course, and probably illegal nonsense, too. It's also a nonsense that any sane grown-up can watch, compare with reality and see it's nonsense.

Coupled with that, we had a really bad attempt to give all of Kirk's helper monkeys some characters and some background, with dialogue and plot devices that would curdle milk. And for a show supposed to be about the virtues of bringing private sector mentality to the public sector, Kirk's employees have an interesting approach to time-keeping, the rule of law, chains of command and even not provoking people to commit crimes

Three episodes in, with Kirk wasting millions on gadgets, discovering policing is more about people than technology and generally coming up with things that just don't work in practice unless a billionaire CEO gives us running his rocket-making company indefinitely so he can sit and fiddle with a joystick all day, I'm starting to think APB is really just a paean to the public sector. We're supposed to watch and enjoy seeing Kirk play with his gadgets, but ultimately discover that the police do things the way they do things for a reason and that they're a lot more dedicated than someone just in it for the big pay cheque. So off he goes with his tail between his leg.

But I'm not sticking around for that, because I can't bear any more of it.

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News: Norman Lovett's Red Dwarf return; Amazon acquires Pastewka; + more

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February 20, 2017

A trailer for season 2 of Les Témoins (Witnesses)

Posted 5 days ago at 21:04 | Post a comment | Bookmark and Share

Les Témoins (Witnesses)

I've been a bit occupied with a broken phone today - grrr, argh - so WHYBW is going to have to wait for another time. But I've not forgotten you. Today - hat-tip to Thierry Attard - we have a trailer or two for season 2 of Les Témoins (Witnesses). Despite its being one of the very few French shows to make it to network TV in the UK, I missed the first season because it started airing just before my August holidays. So I can't tell you what that was about, although the suggestions from Wikipedia are that it was quite conventional.

Witnesses is set in the small coastal town of Le Tréport in northern France, where the bodies of murder victims are being unearthed and left for discovery. The former chief-of-police, Paul Maisonneuve (Thierry Lhermitte), is implicated in the murders. Detectives Justin (Jan Hammenecker) and Sandra (Marie Dompnier) investigate the case

Sounds very vanilla.

However, season 2 looks a bit different. Marie Dompnier returns but one of my favourite actresses - Audrey Fleurot of Engrenages (Spiral) fame - is this season's guest star and here are the trailers I promised you.

If your French is a bit duff, that's "15 men found dead, frozen on a bus. All loved the same woman." And here's a write-up which I genuinely did translate myself this time:

A country road along the North Sea, the first day in Spring. 15 dead men, frozen, found sitting quietly in a bus.

Catherine Keemer: a mysterious woman, an amnesiac, discovered the next day in her car, 100km away. The 15 victims in the bus: all the men shared her love, for one night or a year. Sandra Winckler, a determined and obsessed cop who won't tolerate an unsolved mystery. Sandra Winckler (Marie Dompnier) and Catherine Keemer (Audrey Fleurot): two woman who are going to need to unite for the better and against the worst.

Now that's a bit more interesting. The show's back on France 2 in March but no word yet if either Netflix or Channel 4/Walter Presents is going to pick it up. You'd hope, wouldn't you?

PS No, I don't know why the names are above the wrong people in the poster (the tag line: "Love is the biggest danger")

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News: BBC One's gunpowder plot; Brian Pern tribute; new Stephen King drama; + more

Posted 5 days ago at 07:10 | Post a comment | Bookmark and Share

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  • Julia Ormond, Philippa Coulthard, Joseph Quinn et al joins BBC One's Howard's End

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February 17, 2017

Review: Imposters 1x1-1x2 (US: Bravo)

Posted 8 days ago at 22:07 | Post a comment | Bookmark and Share

Imposters

In the US: Tuesdays, 10/9c, Bravo

Con artists aren't very nice people. They lie, cheat and steal from people to benefit themselves, those people typically being old, trusting and/or not very rich, and who therefore typically end up penniless, destitute, futureless and/or suicidal.

What. A. Downer. Huh?

It's no surprise, therefore, that shows that have focused on 'flim flam' men and women, such as Leverage or Perfect Scoundrels, have usually taken no time at all to give their anti-heroes epiphanies in which they realise that their ways are indeed wicked. Before the end of the first episode even, they're off fleecing the deserving - aka people who are both rich and dicks.

Shows that don't? Downers.

That's certainly how you think Imposters is going to be during its first episode. It sees Rob Heaps playing a sensitive young Jewish man who works for his family-owned firm. He sacrificed everything for his family, including his dreams of seeing Paris, and ends up thinking his life will never amount to anything. Then along comes Belgian breath of fresh air Inbar Levi, the two fall madly in love, and before you know it, they're married and Heaps dares to dream once more.

But before you know it (again), she's emptied their bank account, maxed out the credit cards, taken out a second mortgage on their home and stolen cash from the firm, leaving a parting video explaining that a folder of incriminating evidence will be used to destroy his parents' marriage if he comes looking for her.

All looks bleak and Heaps even tries to commit suicide. Then comes a knock at the door… and the show changes.

Had I not fallen a little behind with my viewing schedule, I might not have bothered watching episode two of Imposters, that first ep is so fundamentally miserable. But since I hadn't watched episode one by the time episode two aired, I ended up watching both en masse. Surprisingly, this is actually probably the best thing you can do, since episode one is less the foundation to the show than its prologue; it's only in episode two that you find out what it's really doing.

It would have helped if the show had stuck to its original title of My So-Called Wife, because oddly enough, Imposters is a buddy-buddy comedy. At Heaps' door is another of Levi's victims - Parker Young (Suburgatory, Enlisted), a knuckle-headed former quaterback and alpha male car salesman. Together, he and the equally penniless and heart-broken Heaps are going to go on a road trip together to find Levi and get their money back. Along the way, they're going to learn the ways of the con artist, be spectacularly bad at them, develop their own code of honour, help each other to get over their former wife, and get on each other's nerves. A lot.

Meanwhile, Levi has moved onto the next job allocated by mysterious boss 'the Doctor' to her and the rest of her team, who include Katherine LaNasa (DeceptionSatisfaction) and Brian Benben (Dream On). With their help, she has to woo a seemingly dickish, cuckolded darts-playing bank CEO (Battlestar Galactica's Aaron Douglas. Yes, it's filmed in Canada - how did you know?), who turns out to be surprisingly sweet. But she's distracted by the possibility of true love with coffee-shop chance encounter Stephen Bishop (Being Mary Jane). Is it time to get out of 'the life' or will the Doctor punish her and Bishop if she tries?

All this is good frothy fun that manages to find both a little depth and a lot more jokes amidst everyone's misery. Levi, who did little as a button-downed Israeli commando on The Last Ship, here demonstrates a really surprising range and is hugely appealing, even when she tricks and misleads everyone she meets. Young and Heaps' routine is both funny and suitably dorky, and their slow crossing over to the dark side is entertaining to watch as they foul up time and again but slowly get better. Their 'code' also shows how morality can blur when you need it to, as they initially write off children and old people as potential marks, settle on 'assholes' as their preferred targets, then decide that 'asshole>old people' in their moral hierarchy when spying a particularly dickish senior with an attractively bulging wallet.

Later episodes are set to add Uma Thurman to the mix, as well as another former spouse of Levi's - a wife this time (Marianne Rendón) - which is bound to change the dynamic of the show once again. Despite its subject matter, while black, Imposters is certainly still a comedy and well worth a try. But you'll need to commit.

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Third-episode verdict: Powerless (US: NBC)

Posted 8 days ago at 17:54 | Post a comment | Bookmark and Share

BarrometerPowerless.jpgA Barrometer rating of 3

In the US: Thursdays, 8.30/7.30c, NBC

You always have to give a show that's had a revamp a little time to settle in. A little.

When Powerless was commissioned, it was a slightly different show from the one we have now. Set in the world of DC Comics, it featured a slightly dodgy insurance agency run by a supervillain that was trying to make money off the poor folks trampled by superheroes in their fight to stop the bad guys.

But twixt pilot and series, there was a bit of retooling. By the first aired episode, cynical old Vanessa Hudgens had turned into a dewy-eyed optimist wanting to make a difference in a branch of Wayne Industries run by Batman's incompetent narcissist cousin (Alan Tudyk). Trouble is she has a bunch of people rejected by Better Off Ted working for her, including Danny Pudi and Ron Funches, all of whom can do little more than copy Lexcorp's inventions. Can Hudgens turn the division round, save everyone from getting fired, help the little people and meet lots of her superhero idols, all without a single superpower to her?

Watching the first episode, the answer seemed to be "Who cares?", "Why aren't there any proper superheroes in this?" and "When do the jokes start?"

The second episode actually proved worse, since the first episode raised the occasional titter, whereas the second was practically soporific, beyond a nice joke about training videos being like The Shining.

Still, there's a reason that I do these as third-episode verdicts, not second-episode verdicts. You have to give things time. And while episode three wasn't exactly an exercise in hilarity, it was at least a reverse of the previous episode's trajectory and I was able to watch the whole thing with a slight grin on my face, at least. The show featured a superhero I'd actually heard of, although it was The Olympian, so I wouldn't describe that as a mainstream pick by the writers. There were a few in-jokes for comic book fans, with Gail Simone and Marv Wolfman getting name-checked. There was also a halfway decent attempt to tie the show a bit more into mainstream community by making Funches Atlantean ("Atlantis: home of Aquaman and character actor William H Macey"), allowing copious references to Aquaman. Corbin Bernsen's arrival as Tudyk's dad seemed to make everyone up their game. And the opening dialogue among the characters about racism ("I thought you said you were from Atlanta" "No, that's Donald Glover, but it might be racist that you heard that") almost made me laugh.

Almost. Because we're still not exactly in Silicon Valley or Man Seeking Woman territory here. But the show is at least finding its feet now. I doubt, given that we'll be at episode four next week, that the show will ever drag itself out of its z-list superhero obsession or become even laugh-out-loud funny. Not giving Danny Pudi any decent lines is a Category A disaster. But you can at least watch it and not feel like Superman near Lex Luthor's kryptonite ring any more, which is a definite improvement.

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When's that show you mentioned starting again, TMINE? Including Lethal Weapon, Chicago Justice, Anne and Dear White People

Posted 8 days ago at 17:31 | Post a comment | Bookmark and Share

Every Friday, I let you know the latest announcements about when new, imported TV shows will finally be arriving on UK screens - assuming anyone's bought anything, of course.

A few new shows have been given their starting dates this week, although most of them are Netflix originals or haven't started airing yet, so I haven't seen them. Oh well, at least you'll know when they start.

Lethal Weapon (US: Fox; UK: ITV)
Friday, March 3, 9pm
Reviews: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14

Chicago Justice (US: NBC; UK: Universal Channel)
Thursday, March 30, 9pm

Dear White People (Netflix)
Friday, April 28

Anne (Canada: CBC; UK: Netflix)
Friday, May 12

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